Monetary Policy, Taxation, and International Investment Strategy

By Victor A. Canto; Arthur B. Laffer | Go to book overview

16
Tax Rate Reductions and
Foreign Exchange Rates

VICTOR A. CANTO

A subtle but important distinction is being neglected in current discussions of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar. It is true that monetary disturbances, such as a deliberate devaluation of a country's currency, will lead to roughly offsetting inflation. It also is true that under a regime of floating exchange rates, differential inflation rates resulting from monetary disturbances will lead to a roughly offsetting change in exchange rates. These relationships reflect what is commonly referred to as purchasing power parity.

The long-run relevance of purchasing power parity is exceptionally strong. A close correspondence exists between the movement of foreign price levels (converted to dollars) and the movements of prices in the United States. However, saying that monetary disturbances result in differential inflation rates and offsetting exchange rate changes does not preclude other factors from also affecting exchange rates. Under a domestic price rule with floating exchange rates, real disturbances, such as fiscal policy changes or shifts in the terms of trade, can cause dramatic changes in exchange rates without the slightest pressure for offsetting inflation. Under fixed exchange rates, real disturbances can also result in differential inflation rates that do not exert any pressure on the foreign exchange markets. In such cases, purchasing power parity will not hold.

The concept of purchasing power parity maintains that the equilibrium exchange rate between the currencies of two countries equals the ratio of their price levels. This, in turn, implies that differences between the inflation rates of two countries will correspond to proportionate changes in the exchange rate. From

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Monetary Policy, Taxation, and International Investment Strategy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction xix
  • Note xlii
  • PART ONE MONETARY POLICY 1
  • 1: Capacity Utilization and Inflation 3
  • 2: World Money and U.S. Inflation 13
  • 3: Alternative Monetary Theories of Inflation 25
  • 5: The Quality of Inflation Indicators 80
  • 6: The Yield Curve 87
  • PART TWO - FISCAL POLICY 93
  • 7 - Bush's Economic Agenda within a Supply-Side Framework 111
  • 8: Tax Amnesty: The Missing Link 113
  • 9: Fifteen Percent is Fine, but Indexing is Divine 123
  • Notes 144
  • 10: Stylized Facts and Fallacies of Capital Gains Tax Rate Reductions and Indexa tion 147
  • 11: Friday the 13th 157
  • 12: Debt and Taxes Are the Only Certainty 165
  • Note 173
  • 13: Borrowed Prosperity 175
  • Notes 187
  • 14: The Savings Monster 189
  • 15: Are We Climbing the Wall of Resistance toward National Health Insurance? 209
  • PART THREE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ISSUES 219
  • 16: Tax Rate Reductions and Foreign Exchange Rates 221
  • Notes 230
  • 17: The Trade Balance 233
  • 18: National Paedomorphosis 241
  • PART FOUR PORTFOLIO STRATEGIES 255
  • 19: Part I: The Legend 257
  • Notes 267
  • 20: Part II 269
  • 21: The Small-Cap and State Competitive Environment 283
  • 22: International Stock Returns and Real Exchange Rates 301
  • Notes 320
  • Index 321
  • About the Contributors 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.