The Coming of Age of Political Economy, 1815-1825

By Gary F. Langer | Go to book overview

1

Introduction

In reading the history of nations, we find that, like individuals, they have their whims and their peculiarities; their seasons of excitement and restlessness, when they care not what they do. We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in its pursuit; that millions of people come simultaneously impressed with one delusion, and run after it, til their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first.

David Mackay, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds ( 1853)


PROLOGUE

Something called political economy came of age in Britain in the first third of the n ineteenth century, particularly during the decade following the end of the Napoleonic Wars. It captured public attention like a fad, acquired media, spokespeople, and classics that it did not have before, and was conspicuously brought to bear on a wide assortment of urgent economic problems in the spectacle of public life. To describe and explain how and why this occurred is the objective of this book.

My answers as to why political economy caught on as it did are several. The most basic, I propose, is that a number of very talented people with extraordinary powers of persuasion and analysis and with very close connections to influential and active political leaders offered, under the banner of science and the weight of a scientific tradition, solutions to problems of urgent political and moral importance. These problems were chiefly those created by the economic crisis

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The Coming of Age of Political Economy, 1815-1825
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History Series Editor. Robert Sobel ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Tables and Figures xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Introduction 9
  • Note 10
  • Part I - The Meaning of Political Economy 11
  • 2 - What Political Economy Meant 13
  • 3 - The Celebrated Masters of Political Economy 27
  • 4 - Allies of Political Economy 51
  • 5 - Opposition to Political Economy 83
  • Part II - Political Economy and Societ 99
  • 6 - Money and Distress 101
  • 7 - Free Trade 129
  • Epilogue 191
  • Notes 193
  • Appendix A Syllabus of George Pryme's Lectures on Political Economy 195
  • Title Page 196
  • Preface 197
  • Preface 198
  • A SYLLABUS &c. &c. Introductory Lecture 200
  • Bibliography 209
  • Index 219
  • About the Author 224
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