Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward an Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education

By Mary E. Clark ; Sandra A. Wawrytko | Go to book overview

questions for which there are no easy rights and wrongs. By doing this, we learn that answers are not all there for us simply to absorb. And this means the realization that it is up to us! There are no broadly informed experts up there, taking care of business for us. We must hone the tools we need to wield effective power; we must learn the arts of political life.

In so doing, we create an active concept of citizenship as meaningful power to shape one's life and society according to one's deepest values. Our understanding of power and self-interest begins to change. Education then becomes a force for the profound democratic awakening needed if we are to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.


NOTES
1.
Frances Moore Lappé and Joseph Collins. Food First: Beyond the Myth of Scarcity ( New York: Ballantine Books, 1977) and World Hunger: Twelve Myths ( San Francisco: Food First Books and Grove Press, 1986).
2.
For a more detailed summary of this view, with historical references, see the introduction to Frances Moore Lappé, Beyond America's Values ( New York: Ballantine Books, 1989).
3.
Roy A. Schotland, "Rich Get Even Richer," letter to the editor, New York Times, May 14, 1989, p. E22; it is based on research by the AFL-CIO.
4.
San Francisco Chronicle, September 12, 1987, p. 5; citing a study by James Gibson, a political scientist from the University of Houston.
5.
George James, "A Revolutionary Idea: Schools' Plastics Ban," The New York Times, April 28, 1989, p. A16.
6.
A. H. Johnson, ed., The Wit and Wisdom of John Dewey ( 1949), pp. 90, 103.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barber Benjamin. Strong Democracy: Participatory Politics for a New Age. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1984.

Boyte Harry C. CommonWealth: A Return to Citizen Politics. New York: Free Press, 1989.

Lappé Frances Moore. Rediscovering America's Values. New York: Ballantine Books, 1989.

Walsh Debbie, and Richard W. Paul. The Goal of Critical Thinking from Educational Ideal to Educational Reality. New York: American Federation of Teachers Educational Issues Department, 1988.

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward an Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.