Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward an Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education

By Mary E. Clark ; Sandra A. Wawrytko | Go to book overview

separating our vague theoretical awareness from the activities now demanded. We need Human and Global Studies, based on, but transcending, the traditional disciplines--studies that directly and holistically address the concerns facing us. Teaching of this kind demands a willingness to promote our well-being first, unfettered by artificial limits. It is not difficult. We need only teach students to ask: "Are current decision-making processes contributing toward the common good? And if not, why not? What can I personally do to ensure that my children will not merely survive, but experience joy"?

This demands teachers who comprehend that understanding without action is empty, who understand that with regard to the issues now paramount for our survival, the emperor of our current institutional core curricula has no clothes. This demands teachers willing to work toward change in the current world order, willing to work dialogically and practically on behalf of human and global responsibility. It demands activists. Is anyone out there listening?


NOTES
1.
Christopher Hitchens, Prepared for the Worst, Selected Essays and Minority Reports ( London: Chatto and Windus, 1988), p. 357.
2.
Arthur Koestler, "A Glance Through the Keyhole," Janus, A Summing Up ( New York: Vintage Books, 1978), p. 274.
3.
The World Commission on Environment and Development, Our Common Future ( Oxford University Press, 1987), p. 343. [This report is often referred to as the Brundtland Report: eds.]
4.
Tarthang Tulku, Gesture of Balance ( Berkeley: Dharma Publishing, 1982), p. 25.
5.
David Suzuki, "Biosphere Dwarfs Other Issues," Toronto Globe and Mail, June 10, 1989, p. D4.
6.
Idiotic, from the Greek Idiotis, meaning a private person--someone who has no awareness beyond his or her own presumed individuality. There are too many idiots today, and they all need educating.
7.
See Jacques Cousteau, "Easter Island," The Cousteau Almanac ( Norfolk: The Cousteau Society), 1981.
8.
This means we are not reducible to any one of our heart, liver, muscle, or circulatory systems, or, in spite of contemporary popular academic philosophical absurdity to the contrary, our brain.
9.
See J. E. Lovelock, Gaia, A New Look at Life on Earth ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989).
10.
[This point is also made in the following paper by Johan Galtung: eds.]
11.
For example, see the many good studies arising out of the Correlates of War Project at the University of Michigan, headed by J. David Singer. This work, based on empirical data, needs continued support as part of a systems analysis of our global situation. Richard Chadwick at the University of Hawaii has contributed to both modeling Military Dynamics, and Environmental and Global modeling. Don MacRae's work with

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