12
Criterion Development in Project A

Lawrence M. Hanser


BACKGROUND AND EARLY PLANNING

Other authors have reviewed the history of the misnorming of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) that occurred in the late 1970s. One outgrowth of the misnorming was a requirement for the military services to demonstrate the validity of ASVAB as a device for screening service applicants. Do those who perform better on ASVAB actually make better soldiers, sailors, and airmen?

Rather than seeing this as a burden of proof required to justify then-current practices, the U.S. Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel and the leadership at the U.S. Army Research Institute (U.S. ARI) for the Behavioral and Social Sciences saw it as an opportunity to undertake research that would advance the army's techniques for selecting and assigning young men and women. This was the fall of 1980. The research program that encompassed the army-sponsored efforts to validate and expand military personnel selection and classification techniques came to be called simply "Project A."

I joined the Army Research Institute in January 1981. During a brief previous visit in fall 1980, I had the occasion to attend a briefing given by Milt Maier on the misnorming of the ASVAB. At that time, I did not realize that the focus of my eight years at ARI would be on validating and extending ASVAB.

My first assignment was to travel to Panama on a little-known and largely undocumented pilot project for Project A. During that trip, we administered surveys to a number of combat soldiers and pored over personnel records to uncover any information about their performance that could be reasonably used

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook on Testing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.