Women, Ethics and the Workplace

By Candice Fredrick; Camille Atkinson | Go to book overview

1
ETHICAL THEORY

The man with a method good for purposes of his dominant interests, is a pathological case in respect to his wider judgment on the coordination of this method with a more complete experience. Priests and scientists, statesmen and men of business, philosophers and mathematicians, are all alike in this respect.

-- Alfred North Whitehead, The Function of Reason


INTRODUCTION

Why are we beginning a book on business ethics with a chapter on philosophical ethical theory? We do so not in order to introduce a method for ethical deliberation that presumes to have universal validity and application. Rather, we begin from the assumption that any such attempt to do so is misguided. For ethics, belonging to the realm of particularly human affairs, is not conducive to formulaic understanding. Moreover, as Whitehead indicates above, it is likely that when one claims to have found a method that is sufficient for dealing with his or her primary interests (be they science, philosophy or business related), he or she will see it as the method and attempt to apply it to all one's endeavors or types of inquiry. In fact, this is precisely what the most influential ethical theorists of the Modern era have done.

Two discernible trends regarding how to approach ethical problems have been dominant since the nineteenth century: specifically, the deontological and utilitarian models. That is, without ever having studied philosophy or even having heard of the two individuals involved, many people's basic moral or ethical intuitions have been shaped or influenced

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Women, Ethics and the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Ethical Theory 1
  • Conclusion 17
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - Feminist Theory 19
  • Conclusion 44
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Sexual Harassment 47
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - Comparable Worth and Value 67
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - Advertising 89
  • Notes 108
  • 6 - Leadership 111
  • Conclusion 131
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - Working-Class Women 135
  • Notes 157
  • Conclusion 159
  • Notes 162
  • Appendix A Anita Hill Testimony 163
  • Appendix B Women, Family, Future Trends: A Selective Overview 169
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 181
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