Women, Ethics and the Workplace

By Candice Fredrick; Camille Atkinson | Go to book overview

Documentation

Without editing yourself in any way, write down all relevant or seemingly relevant information pertaining to the harassment. Be sure to include everything regardless of how trivial it may seem, as such can always be evaluated later. This will help to jog your memory and keep facts in order.

Times and dates are important if a grievance needs to be filed.


Confide

Confide in a coworker and/or seek out other victims if possible. There is a greater likelihood that your grievances will be taken seriously if you have the support and corroboration of others who have information or knowledge that is relevant to your situation.


Elicit outside support

Don't allow feelings of shame to force you into silence. By telling those you trust you will not feel alone, nor will you unwittingly protect the harasser. This action complements Documentation and Confide above, as all are likely to protect you, and perhaps others, from further victimization


NOTES
1.
Jean Kilbourne, Still Killing Us Softly [videocassette], Cambridge, Mass.: Cambridge Documentary Films, 1987. See also, Kilbourne, Slim Hopes [videocassette], Northampton, Mass.: Media Education Foundation, 1995.
2.
Ibid.
3.
See also Jean Kilbourne, Still Killing Us Softly [videocassette], ( Cambridge, Mass.: Cambridge Documentary Films), 1987.
4.
Ellen Frankel Paul, "Bared Buttocks and Federal Cases," Society 4, 1991, Transaction Periodical Consortium.
5.
See Deborah Tannen books, Talking from 9-5 ( New York: William Morrow and Co., 1994) and You Just Don't Understand ( New York: William Morrow, 1990), for in-depth discussion of gender and language use.
6.
Tom L. Beauchamp and Norman E. Bowie, eds., Ethical Theory and Business ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1993), p. 371.
7.
Peggy Crull, "The Impact of Sexual Harassment on the Job: A Profile of the Experiences of 92 Women," Sexuality in Organizations, ed. by D. A. Neugarten and J. M. Shafritz ( Oak Park, Ill.: Moore Publishing Co., 1980), pp. 67-72.
8.
Helen Watson, "Red Herrings and Mystifications: Conflicting Perceptions of Sexual Harassment," Rethinking Sexual Harassment, ed. by Clare de Beauvoir and Yen Lee Too ( London: Pluto Press, 1994), pp. 66-67.
9.
Larry May and John C. Hughes, "Is Sexual Harassment Coercive?,"

-65-

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Women, Ethics and the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Ethical Theory 1
  • Conclusion 17
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - Feminist Theory 19
  • Conclusion 44
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Sexual Harassment 47
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - Comparable Worth and Value 67
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - Advertising 89
  • Notes 108
  • 6 - Leadership 111
  • Conclusion 131
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - Working-Class Women 135
  • Notes 157
  • Conclusion 159
  • Notes 162
  • Appendix A Anita Hill Testimony 163
  • Appendix B Women, Family, Future Trends: A Selective Overview 169
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 181
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