Women, Ethics and the Workplace

By Candice Fredrick; Camille Atkinson | Go to book overview

5
ADVERTISING

"I was born for this, I came into the world for this: to bear witness to the truth; and all who are on the side of truth listen to my voice." "Truth?" said Pilate, "what is that?"

-- John 18:37


INTRODUCTION

A logical place to begin discussing advertising is to look at how it is treated in traditional business texts. For a critique of advertising is incomplete without also discussing the economic umbrella under which business functions, yet these texts seldom critique the capitalistic system. Rather, they speak of peripheral issues, such as the ethics of gamesmanship, or to what extent advertising can be manipulative without being coercive. It is sometimes easier to understand the limits and possibilities of a topic if we first have a base from which to launch our critique. For example, in this book we start with basic ethical theory (see chapters 1 and 2) to provide a foundation on which to build and to apply later to specific issues, such as sexual harassment and comparable worth. We then have a perspective from which to connect theory to practices in affecting the workplace. We can find a groundwork for advertising by examining what it means to tell the truth, what lying entails, and to what extent businesses have a duty to present the public with honest claims concerning their products.

When dealing with the topic of advertising the least common denominator is the virtue of truth. The business world defines this term differ

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Women, Ethics and the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Ethical Theory 1
  • Conclusion 17
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - Feminist Theory 19
  • Conclusion 44
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Sexual Harassment 47
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - Comparable Worth and Value 67
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - Advertising 89
  • Notes 108
  • 6 - Leadership 111
  • Conclusion 131
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - Working-Class Women 135
  • Notes 157
  • Conclusion 159
  • Notes 162
  • Appendix A Anita Hill Testimony 163
  • Appendix B Women, Family, Future Trends: A Selective Overview 169
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 181
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