Women, Ethics and the Workplace

By Candice Fredrick; Camille Atkinson | Go to book overview

6
LEADERSHIP

Implicitly adopting the male life as the norm, they have tried to fashion women out of a masculine cloth. It all goes back, of course, to Adam and Eve--story which shows among other things that if you make a woman out of a man, you are bound to get into trouble.

-- Carol Gilligan


INTRODUCTION

Despite the oft-cited changing demographics of the work force and the optimistic outlook proclaimed by many, women are still significantly underrepresented in top management positions. Presently, women comprise almost half of the U.S. labor force, more than half of the students earning bachelor's and master's degrees, 40 percent of law school graduates, and one-third of MBA recipients. 1 The number of women in senior management positions held steady over five years ( 1990 to 1995) at only five percent. 2 A 1986 article claimed that even though almost one-third of all management positions are filled by women, "most are stuck in jobs with little authority and relatively low pay." 3 Moreover, women don't seem to be doing much better in government or educational institutions. According to a 1989 study by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, only 8.6 percent women in government service were found in positions at Senior Executive Service levels; and a 1986 Department of Labor report showed that colleges and universities employed only 1.1 women at the level of dean or above. 4 The question, then, is what is

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Women, Ethics and the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Ethical Theory 1
  • Conclusion 17
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - Feminist Theory 19
  • Conclusion 44
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - Sexual Harassment 47
  • Notes 65
  • 4 - Comparable Worth and Value 67
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - Advertising 89
  • Notes 108
  • 6 - Leadership 111
  • Conclusion 131
  • Notes 132
  • 7 - Working-Class Women 135
  • Notes 157
  • Conclusion 159
  • Notes 162
  • Appendix A Anita Hill Testimony 163
  • Appendix B Women, Family, Future Trends: A Selective Overview 169
  • Index 175
  • About the Authors 181
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