The Cruel God: Job's Search for the Meaning of Suffering

By Margaret Brackenbury Crook | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
"Though He Slay Me--" . . . Job 12-14:6

The three wisemen, says Job, have no monopoly in wisdom; he recognizes truth as well as they. God is indifferent to moral values, cruel in His treatment of mankind. Job pleads again with God for a hearing that he may know what charges God holds against him. He longs for vindication. There is no answer, and Job is perishing.

Zophar's challenge to Job--Can you explore the Almighty to the utmost?--provides the key to Job's heartbreaking search into the ways of God in this second cycle of the Argument. If the wisemen can speak with confidence that they know the ways of God, so can Job. He begins in a mood of irony.

12:2 Doubtless you are the people,
And Wisdom will die with you.
3 But I have understanding as well as you;
I am not inferior to you.
Yea, who does not know such things as these?

Zophar has claimed a monopoly in wisdom. Job replies that there is no such thing: wisdom is not confined to the teachings of the professional wisemen. This is one of the great principles of the Book of Job. An upright man must be allowed to draw his own conclusions about the ways of God, and these merit the serious attention of the professional teachers. Job expects them to recognize the validity of his experience and to adjust their teaching to include the native wisdom of an educated man. Instead, they refuse to move from their traditional positions. In that case, says Job, wisdom is dying, and the search must now be carried on by those who are aware of "such things as these."

In verse 3, as in 10:13, where Job has already spoken of "these things," he is using a Hebrew word that means "these things

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cruel God: Job's Search for the Meaning of Suffering
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.