The Cruel God: Job's Search for the Meaning of Suffering

By Margaret Brackenbury Crook | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY
The Elder and the Younger Elihu . . . Job 32-37

The Elder Elihu rebukes Jobbecause he justified himself rather than God. He is critical of the friends because they failed to speak for God and remained silent. The justice of the all-seeing God should not be questioned. Jobdeserves punishment. The Younger Elihu, inspired by"the breath of the Almighty,"has no option but to speak. To Jobhe offers persuasive criticism and correct instruction, that Job may put himself in the right with God.

Should this great book be allowed to go to the reader unaccompanied? That was the question raised by its custodians at some unnamed date after the death of the Poet.

We do not know the history of the Book of Job in the years following the Poet's death, but his work must have carried authority from the beginning. Without doubt, his disciples treasured it for a valued masterpiece. Eventually it passed into the hands of men who had not known the Poet and was admitted, as by right, to circles in which the Hebrew books were being collected and edited.

These later custodians, who accept the bold oracles of the prophets, can also tolerate the Poet's work; but they may fear that a book so different from those of the prophets may shock the reader. They wish to offer him guidance that will bring the Book of Job into line with teaching current in their own day. For this reason they see fit to place new speeches between Job's final plea for a hearing and the reply of the Almighty.

Chapters 32 through 37, now generally regarded as an addition to the Poet's work, have almost always been assigned to a single writer.1 In our opinion, and the suggestion is not entirely new, at least two writers can be found here.2

One, whom we shall call the Elder Elihu, finds his wrath

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cruel God: Job's Search for the Meaning of Suffering
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.