Health Insurance and Public Policy: Risk, Allocation, and Equity

By Miriam K. Mills; Robert H. Blank | Go to book overview

4
Financing Health Care Coverage for Displaced Workers

Roger S. Vaughan and Terry F. Buss


INTRODUCTION

Paying for health care is a growing burden, but only a small fraction of the population must carry the weight unaided. The elderly and those on welfare are assisted by publicly financed programs. Three-quarters of the American work force are covered through health insurance plans at work and pay premiums through payroll deductions that are shared with their employers-- and, because coverage is not a taxable benefit, with taxpayers ( Podgursky and Swaim, 1987). For the self-employed, plans are available for those who can afford them.

But the unemployed can draw on none of these benefits. Cut off from health plans, too rich for Medicaid, and unable to pay for the premiums out of benefits that replace, on average, less than half of their income, the majority survive without coverage. A sick child, a personal accident, or a spouse's serious illness can render them medically indigent. Most of the working poor also lack coverage and the means to pay for it. For many, their problems are chronic and must be addressed through a different program than that described in this chapter.

Federal and state governments have tried various ways to extend health services to the medically indigent ( King, 1986). Congress requires employers to allow those laid off to remain enrolled in the plant's health plan at their own expense while at least one employee remains on the local payroll. Massachusetts and Connecticut mandate extension of health coverage for several months after a closing. Yet these measures do not help displaced workers pay for the coverage, particularly when the previous employer is

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Insurance and Public Policy: Risk, Allocation, and Equity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.