Eastern Europe in a Time of Change: Economic and Political Dimensions

By Iliana Zloch-Christy | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1.
Until 2 October 1990 Eastern Europe denoted Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic (GDR), Hungary, Poland, Romania and the Soviet Union. In December 1991 the Soviet Union was dissolved, and most of the former Soviet republics joined the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). In January 1993 Czechoslovakia was divided into Czech and Slovak republics. Eastern Europe as a distinct geographical area with its own political and reformist identity, of course, no longer includes the former GDR. In this book, the terms Eastern Europe, postcommunist Europe, CMEA, and centrally planned economies are used interchangeably.
2.
It might be interesting to mention here the remark Stalin made before the end of the Second World war, which marked the beginning of the Soviet colonization of Eastern Europe: "Whoever occupies a territory also imposes on it his own social system. Everyone imposes his own social system as far as his army can reach. It cannot be otherwise." As regards the former East Germany, the Soviet dictator stated: "The West will make Western Germany their own, and we shall turn Eastern Germany into our own state" (see Milovan Djilas, Conversations with Stalin ( New York: Harcourt Bruce, 1962), pp. 114, 153; cited in Melvin Croan, "Germany and Eastern Europe" in J. Held, ed., 1992, pp. 345-393, 350, 392).
3.
Several interesting studies on the economic changes in Eastern Europe were published after 1989. Some of these publications are Christopher Clague and Gordon C. Rausser, The Emergence of Market Economies in EasternEurope

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Eastern Europe in a Time of Change: Economic and Political Dimensions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • List of Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Eastern Europe on a Road Toward Radical Change 1
  • 2 - Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union 13
  • 3 - Economic Reform and Political Change 29
  • 4 65
  • 5 - Currency Convertibility in the Postcommunist Economies 79
  • Conclusion 111
  • Notes 115
  • Appendix 123
  • References 133
  • Index 137
  • About the Author 145
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