Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

versatile notion than that of core competency which was typically restricted to technical and production competence. The specific actions taken to enhance value must, of course, be viewed against the backdrop of the firm's overall strategy. We now turn our attention to what strategy means in a value framework.


NOTES
1.
In emphasizing the pleasure individuals and groups derived from a particular action (like buying a product), Bentham's perspective corresponded more closely to the modern perspective on value than did the more popular cost- and labor- based theories of value. See Catlin The Progress of Economics ( New York: Bookman, 1962), pp. 145-48 for a fuller evaluation.
2.
Lawrence Miles, Techniques of Value Analysis and Value Engineering ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1961).
3.
Carlos Fallon, Value Analysis to Improve Productivity ( New York: Wiley- Interscience, 1971). Fallon's overview of the discipline is an excellent one notwithstanding his forays into mythology and his references to "the little woman."
4.
Value analysis, in its incarnation as value engineering, progressively developed a preoccupation with cost reduction, a preoccupation that often marginalizes the customer. Glimmers of such an emphasis are evident in Miles's work. In fact, years later Richard Schonberger ( Japanese Manufacturing Techniques ( New York: The Free Press, 1982)) refers to Value Analysis primarily in terms of its cost reduction focus.
5.
Michael Porter, Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors ( New York: Free Press, 1980).
6.
Michael Porter, Competitive Advantage ( New York: The Free Press, 1985).
7.
While BIC no doubt rejuvenated the anemic writing instrument market in the early 1960s, Gilette was quick to respond to the customer expectations that BIC had stimulated. Gilette's thirty-nine cent retractable, twenty-nine cent fine- line porous point and nineteen cent non-retractable pens were introduced to take advantage of the booming low-price end that BIC successfully tapped into. See "BIC Pen Corporation (A)" in Roland Christensen, et al., Policy Formulation and Administration ( Homewood, IL: Irwin, 9th ed., 1985), p. 292.
8.
Ron Zemke with Dick Schaaf, The Service Edge ( New York: Penguin, 1990), p. 530.
9.
See Daniel Robey Designing Organizations ( Homewood, IL: Irwin, 2nd ed., 1986), pp. 467-69.
10.
Gary Jacobson and John Hillkirk, Xerox: American Samurai ( New York: Collier, 1987), pp. 256-60.
11.
Rudyard Kipling "The Ballad of East and West," Collected Verse of Rudyard Kipling ( New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1916), p. 136.
12.
Attributed to the French statesman Talleyrand though the lines were also spoken by Clemenceau without acknowledgement.
13.
Rudyard Kipling. "The Ballad of East and West." Collected Verse of Rudyard Kipling ( New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1916) p. 136.

-33-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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