Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview
the ground covered in this chapter. In our view, the creation of value is squarely based in the introduction and acceptance of increased interdependence. However, the story certainly does not end there. Other factors that are indispensable to achieving and sustaining maximum value will now enter the picture. Some of these drivers of value are
the interfaces among the 3Cs as well as with outside entities (such as suppliers and customers);
internally generated, continuous efforts to enhance value based on employee motivation and enthusiasm;
an organizational culture that fosters and cements the beliefs and norms that make the edifice of the value-creating firm an unshakable one;
measures that help find out if the firm is on the right course and provide for corrective actions to be taken where necessary.

We shall address these concerns, in sequence, in the chapters to follow.


NOTES
1.
For a sampling of Ayn Rand views see "What is Capitalism," in Ayn Rand , ed., Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal ( New York: Signet, 1967), pp. 11-34.
2.
The market failure framework was first proposed by Ronald Coase, "The Nature of the Firm," Economica, new series, 1938, 4: 386-405. It was subsequently expanded and refined by Oliver Williamson, Markets and Hierarchies: Analysis and Antitrust Implications ( New York: Free Press, 1975).
3.
The group orientation of the Japanese and the effect of this emphasis on organizations, the importance of harmony and of "face" are lucidly analyzed in Edwin Reischauer, The Japanese Today ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988), pp. 128-37.
4.
James Thompson, Organizations in Action ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967), pp. 54-59.
5.
Ibid., pp. 19-23.
6.
Ibid., pp. 56-65.
7.
See Taiichi Ohno, Toyota Production System: Beyond Large Scale Production ( Cambridge, MA: Productivity Press, 1988).
8.
Ibid.
9.
Kiyoshi Suzaki, The New Manufacturing Challenge ( New York: The Free Press, 1987), pp. 45-68.
10.
Ibid., p. 49.
11.
Ibid., pp. 146-79.
12.
James Thompson, Organizations in Action, p. 56.
13.
Edward Hay, The Just-in-Time Breakthrough ( New York: Wiley, 1988) provides a detailed analysis of the centrality of line balance to make a program of inventory reduction and smooth production flow realizable.
14.
Seiichi Nakajima, Introduction to TPM ( Cambridge, MA: Productivity Press, 1988).

-76-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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