Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

5
INTEGRATION: CREATING A SHARED VISION OF VALUE

THE BRAIN AND THE COMMAND-CONTROL MODEL
The human brain, with its capability to carry out tremendously complex functions is indeed an amazing instrument. Contained within our cranial cavities is a versatile, highly specialized device. Among the more important cerebral components and the functions they perform are:
the cerebrum, consisting of two hemispheres, each similar in appearance to a walnut kernel. Under the surface of the cerebrum is the cerebral cortex, the center of sensory, associative and motor activities. Memory capability is a property of the cortex but one that is dispersed rather than confined to any part of it;
the cerebellum, found under the rear part of the cerebrum. Like the cerebrum, it, too, is comprised of two hemispheres. It coordinates muscular activity and functions as the motor feedback center;
the limbic system, or "the mammalian brain," makes an organism warm- blooded, and is the processor of emotional reactions and the aggression urge;
the brain stem which, coupled with the spinal cord, comprises the central nervous system. It acts as the locus of incoming messages and outgoing commands. 1

The most popular image of the brain is that it is the central control point for all the actions--be it information processing, physical movement or verbal communication--performed by an individual. The exercise of control is no doubt a critical aspect of the brain's activities. As such it

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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