Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

7
IN GRAINING: PRACTICAL IDEALS

CONSCIOUSNESS AND CULTURE

Two of the more influential scientific thinkers of this century were Einstein and Heisenberg. Einstein's life and achievements have received fairly wide public notice. His theories of relativity have undoubtedly opened our eyes to the world around us. The concept of the space-time continuum (with time as a fourth dimension), the "warping" or curvature of space-time, and the constant relative speed of light regardless of the observer's speed are just a few of his stunning theories, most of which have since been supported. Far less famous, though no less crucial to the development of modern science, was Werner Heisenberg, who, unlike Einstein, elected to stay in Germany when the Nazis assumed the reins of government. Building on Max Planck's postulate that energy is transferred in discrete packets called quanta, Heisenberg threw a huge monkey wrench into the smooth, satisfying progress of physics. He asserted the impossibility of determining both the velocity and location of a particle at any point in time. In dealing with small-scale phenomena (atomic and subatomic particles), predictions would have to be hedged in terms of probabilities and not framed in absolute terms. Quantum physics and the Uncertainty Principle made the observer an important part of a system under observation. There were immediate objections to this "iffy" state of affairs. Einstein reportedly protested that "God does not play dice.'' 1. These objections have continued to this day. Conversely, there have also been extensions of the notion of uncertainty even to the extent of sug-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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