The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook

By Sally M. Miller | Go to book overview

Kong's Wah Kiu Yat Po failed to find a market for a North American edition launched in New York in 1976. In 1980 Taiwan Times established the Far East Times in San Francisco, only to close down in 1982.


CONCLUSION

Publishing a Chinese newspaper never was, nor is it now, a lucrative business. Most organs spoke for the interests of specific political groups or factions. In the 1980s the great majority of the newspapers lean to the right of center. Many support the Taiwan regime, reflecting the hold which the Kuomintang still have on important segments of the Chinese--American community. However, in recent years, since the improvement in relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China, a growing number of newspapers have tried to be more even-handed in their reporting on Taiwan and on the PRC. Increasing attention is also being given to Chinese--American issues.

Until recently the reporting style in most Chinese--American newspapers was stereotyped, production methods were archaic, and because of the low circulation, capital was usually unavailable for expansion. A few years ago, with the passing of the older immigrant generation and the declining use of Chinese by the American-born generation, which was rapidly being acculturated into American society, Chinese--language newspapers seemed doomed to extinction. This is illustrated by the example of Hawaii, where the once flourishing Chinese press is moribund. The increased Chinese immigration to the U.S. mainland since the mid--1960s, however, has given the Chinese--American press a new lease on life. The newer newspapers have also brought in a higher, more professional standard of journalism.

During the early 1980s, there were some fifteen dailies (each nationally distributed newspaper is considered to be a single entity regardless of the number of local editions) which included local news items, and seven foreign journals which were reprints of the home editions. There was also an ever changing number of semiweeklies, weeklies, biweeklies, and monthlies, with more than thirty-five at the last count. These phenomena reflect the fact that the Chinese-- American community is very complex and consists of a number of diverse components. As a result, it is doubtful whether any other ethnic community of comparable size (about 1 million) in the United States has more varied fare for its reading public.


NOTES
1.
Gongzhen Ge, Zhongguo Baoye Shi (History of the Chinese Press) ( Beijing: Sanlian Shudian, 1955; reprint of 1935 edition of Commercial Press, Shanghai), p. 64.
2.
Karl Lo, "Kin Shan Jit San Luk, the First Chinese Paper Published in America," in Chinese Historical Society of America Bulletin 6 ( December 1971): n.p.
3.
The Golden Hills' News, June 10, 1854.
4.
The Oriental, January 4, 1855.

-39-

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The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxi
  • 1: The Arabic-Language Press 1
  • Notes 13
  • Bibliography 14
  • 2: The Carpatho-Rusyn Press 15
  • Introduction 15
  • Conclusion 23
  • Notes 23
  • Notes 26
  • 3: The Chinese-American Press 27
  • Notes 39
  • Notes 42
  • 4: The Croatian Press 45
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 58
  • 5: The Danish Press 59
  • Bibliography 69
  • 6: The Dutch Press 71
  • Notes 82
  • Notes 83
  • 7: The Filipino-American Press 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Conclusion 95
  • Notes 96
  • Notes 99
  • 8: The Finnish Press 101
  • BEBLIOGRAPHY 113
  • 9: The Franco-American Press 115
  • Bibliography 128
  • 10: The German-American Press 131
  • Bibliography 158
  • 11: The Greek Press 161
  • Notes 174
  • Bibliography 176
  • 12: The Irish-American Press 177
  • Bibliography 188
  • 13: The Japanese-American Press 191
  • Bibliography 202
  • 14: The Jewish Press 203
  • Bibliography 227
  • 15: The Latvian and Lithuanian Press 229
  • Bibliography 236
  • Notes 242
  • Bibliography 244
  • 16: The Mexican-American Press 247
  • Bibliography 260
  • 17: The Norwegian-American Press 261
  • Bibliography 273
  • 18: The Polish-American Press 275
  • Bibliography 289
  • 19: The Portuguese Press 291
  • Bibliography 302
  • 20: The Puerto Rican Press 303
  • Bibliography 314
  • 21: The Romanian Press 315
  • Bibliography 324
  • 22: The Russian Press 325
  • Bibliography 335
  • 23: The Serbian Press 337
  • Bibliography 351
  • 24: The Slovak-American Press 353
  • Bibliography 368
  • 25: The Slovene-American Press 369
  • Bibliography 377
  • 26: The Swedish Press 379
  • Bibliography 391
  • 27: The Ukrainian Press 393
  • Bibliography 407
  • About the Editor and Contributors 409
  • Index 415
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