The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook

By Sally M. Miller | Go to book overview

16
The Mexican-American Press

CARLOS E. CORTÉS

In 1926 Ignacio Lozano, a Mexican immigrant publisher who had escaped from the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution, established a weekly newspaper entitled La Opinión in Los Angeles. As of 1984, La Opinión was still in operation under the direction of his son, Ignacio Lozano, Jr. As the nation's oldest current Mexican-American newspaper, La Opinión stands as a notable success story in the perilous history of the Mexican-American press, rooted in the larger historical process of the Mexican-American people. 1

The Mexican-American press can only partially be considered an immigrant press, because Mexican Americans (Chicanos) are only partially an immigrant- origin people. Chicanos became part of the United States through two processes-- annexation and immigration. Mexican Americans first entered U.S. history via annexation. In 1822 Anglo-Americans from the United States began to settle in the northeastern corner of Mexico, which had just won its independence from Spain. In 1835, supported by some native Mexicans who opposed the central government, Anglo settlers revolted and, in 1836, established the independent Lone Star Republic. When, in 1845, the Republic joined the United States as the state of Texas, the 5,000 Mexicans in Texas became the first large group of Mexican Americans.

Closely following the Texas annexation came the 1846-1848 U.S.-Mexican War, during which U.S. forces occupied Mexico's northern provinces of New Mexico and California and captured Mexico City, the nation's capital. The subsequent 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo recognized U.S. possession of northern Mexico (about one-third of Mexico's territory--one-half counting Texas) and specified the rights of the some 75,000 Mexicans living in the annexed territory. Finally, in 1854, via the Gadsden Treaty, Mexico sold to the United States a 30,000-square-mile strip of land (on which some 5,000 Mexicans were living) in today's southern New Mexico and Arizona. As historian David Weber has described it, Mexicans in these three territorial transfers had truly become "foreigners in their native land." 2

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The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxi
  • 1: The Arabic-Language Press 1
  • Notes 13
  • Bibliography 14
  • 2: The Carpatho-Rusyn Press 15
  • Introduction 15
  • Conclusion 23
  • Notes 23
  • Notes 26
  • 3: The Chinese-American Press 27
  • Notes 39
  • Notes 42
  • 4: The Croatian Press 45
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 58
  • 5: The Danish Press 59
  • Bibliography 69
  • 6: The Dutch Press 71
  • Notes 82
  • Notes 83
  • 7: The Filipino-American Press 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Conclusion 95
  • Notes 96
  • Notes 99
  • 8: The Finnish Press 101
  • BEBLIOGRAPHY 113
  • 9: The Franco-American Press 115
  • Bibliography 128
  • 10: The German-American Press 131
  • Bibliography 158
  • 11: The Greek Press 161
  • Notes 174
  • Bibliography 176
  • 12: The Irish-American Press 177
  • Bibliography 188
  • 13: The Japanese-American Press 191
  • Bibliography 202
  • 14: The Jewish Press 203
  • Bibliography 227
  • 15: The Latvian and Lithuanian Press 229
  • Bibliography 236
  • Notes 242
  • Bibliography 244
  • 16: The Mexican-American Press 247
  • Bibliography 260
  • 17: The Norwegian-American Press 261
  • Bibliography 273
  • 18: The Polish-American Press 275
  • Bibliography 289
  • 19: The Portuguese Press 291
  • Bibliography 302
  • 20: The Puerto Rican Press 303
  • Bibliography 314
  • 21: The Romanian Press 315
  • Bibliography 324
  • 22: The Russian Press 325
  • Bibliography 335
  • 23: The Serbian Press 337
  • Bibliography 351
  • 24: The Slovak-American Press 353
  • Bibliography 368
  • 25: The Slovene-American Press 369
  • Bibliography 377
  • 26: The Swedish Press 379
  • Bibliography 391
  • 27: The Ukrainian Press 393
  • Bibliography 407
  • About the Editor and Contributors 409
  • Index 415
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