Phoenix from the Ashes: The Literature of the Remade World

By Carl B. Yoke | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Especially cogent articles and reviews of Alas, Babylon appeared in the New York Times Book Review, March 22, 1959, p. 43; Library Journal, April 1, 1959, p. 115; Saturday Review, June 13, 1959, p. 20; Analog, September 1959, pp. 145-47; and Galaxy, December 1959, p. 150. Articles and reviews of On the Beach appeared in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, October 1957, pp. 102-3; New Worlds, November 1957, p. 124; Analog, February 1958, pp. 144-45; Galaxy, March 1958, pp. 119-20; and the Journal of British Studies, Spring 1977, pp. 121-42. In addition, both novels are discussed in Frank N. Magill, ed., Survey of Science Fiction Literature (Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Salem Press, 1979).
2.
Pat Frank, Alas, Babylon ( New York: Bantam Books, 1959), p. 16.
3.
Nevil Shute, On the Beach ( 1957; reprint, New York: Ballantine Books, 1974), p. 268.
5.
In his review of Alas, Babylon for Galaxy ( December 1959, p. 150), Floyd Gale remarks, "Survival in that region, though hard, looks easy." This situation, surviving well in adverse circumstances, is one of the trademarks of romantic fiction, especially the historical/wilderness romance after which Alas, Babylon is patterned.
6.
In his review of On the Beach for Analog ( February 1958, pp. 144-45), P. Schuyler Miller asserts, "The major air of unreality about the book is the quiet, genteel manner in which everyone, the world over, lies quietly down to die--without panic, without rioting, without private or public hysteria, down to the last dog and cat." It is this calm acceptance of the inevitable that gives the ending of On the Beach its dignity. The people in the novel do not, in Dylan Thomas' words, "rage against the dying of the light," but neither do they see Eliot's two alternatives as the only ones.
7.
Donald Wollheim, The Universe Makers ( New York: Harper & Row, 1971). p. 66.

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