The Superpowers and Nuclear Arms Control: Rhetoric and Reality

By Dennis Menos | Go to book overview

On the issue of deterrence, the Methodist and Catholic viewpoints differ. Methodists reject the concept as unacceptable; Catholics accept deterrence but only as a transitional strategy on the route to disarmament.

Although the principal thrust of the Methodist letter is on man's ability to undo Creation by his never-ending acquisition of weapons of mass destruction, the Roman Catholic letter focuses on the weapons themselves:

We do not perceive any situation, in which the deliberate initiation of nuclear war, on however restricted a scale, can be morally justified. . . . Under no circumstances may nuclear weapons or other instruments of mass slaughter be used for purposes of destroying population centers or other predominantly civilian targets. . . . The whole world must summon the moral courage and technical means to say no to nuclear conflict; no to weapons of mass destruction; no to an arms race which robs the poor and the vulnerable.

Admittedly, neither the two church letters nor the Episcopal statement on nuclear war have made any difference in the formulation of U.S. nuclear policies. They have influenced the Kremlin's policies even less. But for millions of Catholics, Episcopalians, and Methodists, the three documents represent official statements of moral principle. To date, the church statements have posed no major moral dilemma to our citizens, probably because no specific action is required of them other than opposition to the arms race, which most of them share anyway. By addressing the moral and theological dimensions of the nuclear arms race, however, the churches of America in effect are warning the U.S. government that they are urging their faithful in formulating their positions on nuclear issues to consider religious convictions along with official policy. Pushed to extreme, this may confront citizens with a major religious--political clash when they must choose between loyalty to their nation and having to uphold the dictates of their faith.


NOTES
1.
For a history of U.N. efforts in the area of disarmament, refer to United Nations, Department for Disarmament Affairs, United Nations and Disarmament: A Short History ( New York, 1988).
2.
Lawrence D. Weiler, "General Disarmament Proposals," Arms Control Today, July/August 1986, p. 6.
3.
The Disarmament Commission is still in existence, but its importance is overshadowed by the Conference on Disarmament, the United Nations' principal body for negotiating arms control and disarmament issues. The Disarmament Commission meets in New York, the conference in Geneva.
4.
United Department for Disarmament Affairs Nations, The United Nations Disarmament Yearbook. Vol. 12, 1987 ( New York: United Nations, 1987), p. 74.
5.
United Nations, Department for Disarmament Affairs, United Nations and Disarmament 1945-1985 ( New York: United Nations, 1985), p. 3.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Superpowers and Nuclear Arms Control: Rhetoric and Reality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Enough is Never Enough 1
  • Notes 21
  • 2 - The Superpowers 25
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - The Impotent Opposition 49
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - Tearing Down the Few Past Accomplishments 71
  • Notes 90
  • 5 - The Politics of Arms Control 95
  • 6 - The Endless Negotiations 123
  • Notes 141
  • Appendixes 145
  • Selected Excerpts 155
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.