Cross-Cultural Business Negotiations

By Donald W. Hendon; Rebecca Angeles Hendon et al. | Go to book overview

17
Conclusions: Dos and Don'ts of Cross-Cultural Negotiations
International business negotiators are separated from each other not only by physical features, a totally different language and business etiquette, but also by a different way to perceive the world, to define business goals, to express thinking and feeling, to show or hide motivation and interests. The way one succeeds in cross-cultural negotiations is by fully understanding others, using that understanding to one's own advantages to realize what each party wants from the negotiations, and to turn the negotiations into a win-win situation for both sides.
TEN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUCCESS
1. The path to success in negotiations is "prepare, prepare, prepare." Preparation is essential if one is to be proactive rather than reactive. Counterpunching only works when you are prepared before the blow is thrown. Preparation is difficult enough in domestic negotiations, but when the many multifaceted cross-cultural aspects are added the problems and time necessary for adequate planning rise exponentially. Planning means coming prepared technically as well as culturally. Many foreigners come to the negotiating table well prepared technically and operationally and expect you to be likewise. Poor preparation, in addition to being a major obstacle to your success in achieving an agreement, can also have adverse cultural considerations--in the Orient not having the answers or being sloppy

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