Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

On the basis of her lifelong dedication to the cause of equal rights, whether for equal pay for government employees, the right of a woman to study law and practice as an attorney, or the right of women to vote, Bennett Lockwood contributed as much as any other individual to the attainment of that goal. Thus, the power of her rhetoric lay not only in the arguments she advanced, but also in who she was and what she achieved. Many held her up as an example worthy of emulation. Late in life, she noted that she had some forty or fifty namesakes ( Washington Herald, October 25, 1912). However powerful her arguments were before courts of law, attested by the many in which she was successful, and however eloquent her speeches to reformers, on the hustings, or in lecture halls, the most significant single element of her rhetoric was her image, her example. She had opened doors and pointed the way for those who would follow. As she said, "I never stopped fighting. My cause was the cause of thousands of women" ( New York World, November 3, 1912).


SOURCES

There is no major collection of the Bennett Lockwood Papers. The Belva A. Lockwood Papers in the Swarthmore College Peace Collection (SCPC) include biographical materials, correspondence, some articles and newspaper clippings, and several pamphlets based on speeches concerning peace through arbitration. The Belva Lockwood Papers in the Ormes-Winner Collection (O-W), New York State Historical Association, include approximately 500 pages of handwritten manuscripts divided into (1) The New Woman; (2) Women in the Professions; (3) On Marriage; (4) On Prosperity and Existing Conditions; (5) On Equal Rights for Women; (6) Across the Continent--Suffrage--Memorial Day; (7) On Temperance; (8) Miscellaneous. Although some are lengthy, none is complete.


Biographical Sources

Scholarly works include:

Clark Allen C. "Belva Ann Lockwood." Records of the Columbia Historical Society ( Washington, D.C., 1935) 35-36:206ff, 209f, 212.

Filler Louis. "Lockwood, Belva Ann Bennett McNall." NAW 2:413-416.

Stern Madeleine B. "The First Woman Admitted to Practice Before the United States Supreme Court, Belva Ann Lockwood." We the Women. New York: Schulte, 1963, pp. 205-234.

Stevens Peter F. "When the Women Came to Des Moines." The Iowan (Spring 1988):44-47.

Winner Julia Hull. "Belva A. Lockwood--That Extraordinary Woman." New York History 39 ( October 1958):321-340.

Two articles by Bennett Lockwood are also informative: "My Efforts to Become a Lawyer," Lippincott's Monthly Magazine 41 ( February 1888):215-229; and "How I Ran for the Presidency," National Magazine ( March 1903):728-733.

Partial biographies include:

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.