Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

Not only was Cady Stanton an advocate who influenced the U.S. public for over half a century, but she was also a leader in a great social movement. Her works still speak to us because they address issues of continuing concern, her arguments are grounded in cherished cultural values, and her skills with metaphor, analogy, and humor bring her ideas vividly before our eyes.


SOURCES

Elizabeth Cady Stanton's rhetoric is found in these major sources: the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Papers, Library of Congress, available on microfilm (ECSP, Reels 1-5); the History of Women microfilm collection (HOW), incorporating materials from many special collections; the journals that were the major outlets for woman's rights advocates such as the Lily, Una, Revolution, Woman's Journal, Woman's Tribune, and National Bulletin; and the Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, eds. Patricia G. Holland and Ann D. Gordon. Amherst: University of Massachusetts, 1990, microfilm and guide. Other primary sources are:

Elizabeth Cady Stanton As Revealed in Her Letters, Diary, and Reminiscences. 2 vols. Eds. Theodore Stanton and Harriot Stanton Blatch. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1922. (LDR)

Stanton Elizabeth Cady. Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences 1815-1897. 1898. Intro. Gail Parker. New York: Schocken, 1971.

Stanton Elizabeth Cady, and the Revising Committee. The Woman's Bible. 2 vols. 1895, 1898. Seattle: Coalition Task Force on Women and Religion, 1974.


Critical sources

Campbell Karlyn Kohrs. "Stanton's 'The Solitude of Self': A Rationale for Feminism." Quarterly Journal of Speech 66 ( October 1980):304-312.

-----. MCSFH 1:49-103, 133-144.

Goodman James E. "The Origins of the 'Civil War' in the Reform Community: Elizabeth Cady Stanton on Woman's Rights and Reconstruction." Critical Matrix: Princeton Working Papers in Women's Studies 1, no. 2 ( 1985):1-29.

Kern Kathi L. "Rereading Eve: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and The Woman's Bible, 1885- 1896." Women's Studies 19 ( 1991):371-383.

McCurdy Frances. "Women Speak Out in Protest." The Rhetoric of Protest and Reform, 1878-1898. Ed. Paul Boase. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1980, pp. 185- 211.

Waggenspack Beth M. The Search for Self-Sovereignty: The Oratory of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1989, pp. 1-93. Texts in this source are replete with errors.


Biographical Sources

Banner Lois. Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Radical for Women's Rights. Boston: Little, Brown, 1980.

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