Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

labor movement on its own ground. The league's difficulties were not unique. Feminists have yet to formulate an analysis that comes to terms with working women's dual status, and feminism has yet to make a significant impact on the American labor movement. ( Dye, 1980:4)


CONCLUSION

Dreier Robins's legacy to the labor and the woman's rights/woman suffrage movements is an important one. Although she neither produced a rhetorical masterpiece nor served as a guiding force behind landmark legislation, her efforts to explain and solve the problems of working women were a rhetorical link between these two great social movements. She saw a natural affinity between struggles for civil rights for women and for industrial democracy in addressing the plight of working women, and she sought to speak to both and bring them together.


SOURCES

The Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida, Gainesville, and those of other WTUL women, are available on microfilm as Papers of the Women's Trade Union League and Its Principal Leaders (PWPL; Dreier Robins Papers, Collection 1, especially reel 12). Proceedings of the Biennial Convention of the NWTUL (PBC), Library of Congress, are on microfilm; one essay and the 1913 NWTUL convention address are in HOW, Reel 944.


Selected Biographical Sources

Biographical Cyclopedia of American Women. Vol. 2. Ed. Erma Conklin Lee. New York: n. p., 1925.

Dreier Mary E. Margaret Dreier Robins: Her Life, Letters and Work. New York: Island Press, 1950.

Estes Barbara Ann. "Margaret Dreier Robins: Social Reformer and Labor Organizer." Ph.D. diss., Ball State University, 1977.

Payne Elizabeth Anne. Reform, Labor, and Feminism: Margaret Dreier Robins and the Women's Trade Union League. Urbana, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1988.


Selected Studies of the NWTUL and Working Women

Dye Nancy Schrom. As Equals & As Sisters: Feminism, Unionism, and the Women's Trade Union League of New York. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1980.

Eisenstein Sarah. Give Us Bread But Give Us Roses: Working Women's Consciousness in the United States, 1890 to the First World War. Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

Hyman Collette A. "Labor Organizing and Female Institution-Building: The Chicago Women's Trade Union League, 1904-1924." Women, Work & Protest: A Centuryof US Women's Labor History

-180-

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