Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

FLORENCE KELLEY
(1859-1932), advocate for children, working women, and consumers

KAREN E. ALTMAN

Florence Kelley's achievements during the early decades of the twentieth century spanned industrial, political, and legal reform, but the unwavering focus of her life's work was labor reform for working women and children. Her rhetorical accomplishments included the ability to adapt to widely differing audiences and to analyze social problems, advocate specific solutions, and motivate others to action. Beginning with her bachelor's thesis in 1882 and continuing until her death in 1932, she built a corpus of translations, books, speeches, articles, editorials, organizational reports, social scientific surveys, congressional testimony, radio addresses, book reviews, correspondence, and an autobiography.

Widely recognized for her thirty-three year leadership of the National Consumers' League (NCL), Kelley contributed so much to changing social policy that, twenty years after her death, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter concluded that she was "a woman who had probably the largest single share in shaping the social history of the United States during the first thirty years of this century" ( Goldmark, 1953:v).

Among the many reforms to which Kelley contributed as the voice of the NCL were the Louis Brandeis brief that undergirded Muller v. Oregon ( 1908), the first federal case upholding the constitutionality of protective labor legislation for women; enactment and enforcement of numerous minimum wage, maximum hour, and child labor laws; establishment of the U.S. Children's Bureau; passage of woman suffrage; and arguments, organizations, and networks that transformed much of nineteenth-century philanthropy into the profession of social work.


FORMATIVE EXPERIENCES

Florence Kelley was born and raised in Philadelphia. Her Irish Protestant father William Darrah Kelley was a lawyer and judge who worked with Abraham Lincoln to form the Republican party and capped his career with thirty years service in the U.S. House of Representatives. Her mother Caroline Bartram Bonsall grew up in the Quaker family of Isaac and Elizabeth Pugh, a household that included abolitionist Sarah Pugh. William and Caroline Kelley were the parents of eight children; only Florence and one brother reached adulthood.

Kelley's earliest challenges were illness and loneliness. Her mother was occupied with the sicknesses and deaths of many children; her father was often away for congressional work. She herself spent many years out of school due to illness.

During time spent at her maternal grandparents' home, Kelley absorbed Quaker values along with family commitments to anti-slavery and woman suffrage,

-294-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.