Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

did not linger long at itemizing grievances. She was more at home with proclaiming "redemption" than calling for "purification." She was, simply, more a club leader than a movement leader.

Finally, for scholars, Ward Howe continues to be an anomaly. Her divergent private and public lives may invite some to question the authenticity of a woman who survived a miserable marriage only to parade it as "the nation's most sacred institution"; who found motherhood a distraction from writing, yet founded a national holiday honoring mothers; who suffered repeated bouts of depression, yet became the voice of eternal optimism. To be sure, her troubles antedated her leadership in the movement, but the inconsistencies remain a mystery. However, her rhetorical status as "patriotic crusader for woman's rights" capably filled the movement's need to mainstream its message, and her legendary status as "Great American Mother" gave the movement a veneer of propriety that it so desperately desired.


SOURCES

Primary sources are the Julia Ward Howe Collections, Houghton Library (HL), Harvard, and Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe; Library of Congress; Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College Library, Northampton, Massachusetts.

Howe Julia Ward. Julia Ward Howe and the Woman Suffrage Movement: A Selection from Her Speeches and Essays. Intro. Florence Howe Hall. Boston: D. Estes, 1913. (WSM)

A Reply to Dr. E. H. Clarke's 'Sex in Education.' Ed. and intro. Julia Ward Howe. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1874.

Howe Julia Ward. Is Polite Society Polite? and Other Essays. Boston: Lamson, Wolffe, 1895.

-----. Modern Society. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1881.

-----. The Woman's Journal. Selected Entries. 1870- 1893. (TWJ)


Collected Poetry, Plays, and Autobiographies

-----. Passion Flowers. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1854.

-----. Words for the Hour. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1856.

-----. The World's Own. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1857.

-----. A Trip to Cuba. Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1860.

-----. Reminiscences, 1819-99. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1900.

-----. Later Lyrics. Boston: J. E. Tilton, 1866.

-----. From the Oak to the Olive. A Plain Record of a Pleasant Journey. Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1868.


Selected Biographical Sources

Clifford Deborah Pickman. Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Biography of Julia Ward Howe. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978. See reviews by Karen J. Blair, Journal of American History 66 ( March 1980):952-953; Judy Barrett Litoff, American Historical Review 85

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.