Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

conditions for all thy little ones. If the ballot is what we now need, give us the complete ballot." By setting forth the condition of women in dramatic form, she showed women from every background that their collective experience of injustice bound them to a common cause.


SOURCES

There are no dissertations, articles, or books about Waugh McCulloch. Standard histories of the suffrage movement mention her only briefly (HWS 4 and 6; IWSM; Flexner, 256). The primary source of information is the Catharine Waugh McCulloch papers, History of Women Collection, Schlesinger Library (SL), Radcliffe College, available on six reels of microfilm, E29-E34; documents are numbered consecutively. Citations in the text follow the Schlesinger Library system.


Secondary Sources

Beldon Gertrude May. "A History of the Woman Suffrage Movement in Illinois." M.A. thesis, University of Chicago, 1913.

Boyer Paul. "McCulloch, Catharine Gouger Waugh." NAW 2:459-460.

Brown Gertrude Foster. "The Opposition Breaks." Victory and How Women Won It. New York: H. W. Wilson, 1946, pp 83-94.

Buechler Steven M. The Transformation of the Woman Suffrage Movement: The Case Study of Illinois, 1850-1920. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1986.

Deland Margaret Wade (Campbell). "Change in the Feminine Ideal." Atlantic Monthly 105 ( March 1910): 289-302.

Freund Ernst. "Review of Mr. Lex." American Journal of Sociology 5 ( July 1899-May 1900):277.

MacKinnon Catharine. Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1987.

Trout Grace Wilbur. "Sidelights on Illinois Suffrage History." Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society 12, no. 2 ( July 1920):145-179.

W. H.A. "Review of Mr. Lex." Journal of Political Economy 7 ( December 1898- September 1899).

Wheeler Adade Mitchell. "Conflict in the Illinois Woman Suffrage Movement of 1913." Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society 76, no. 2 (Summer 1983):95-114.


Chronology of Major Works

The following speeches are in the McCulloch Papers; most are on SL 32 and 33.

"Cogito Ergo Sum," June 1882.

"School Suffrage for Illinois Women," ca. 1891.

"Colonial Mothers," ca. 1905.

"A Chicago Fable," ca. 1907.

"Some Wrongs of Michigan Women, 1850-1908." Address, Michigan Constitutional Convention, January 8, 1908.

"Guardianship of Children." Chicago Legal News, January 13, 1912.

-460-

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