him that he was not drunk. 'You shee, commissionaire, thish ish how it ish: when I look drunk I am shober, and when I look shober I am very drunk. Sho you mushn't judge by appearanshes, commissionaire.' Sarah felt obliged to step aside; and hearing her saying that she felt a little better when she returned, they stood on the pavement's edge, a little puzzled by the brilliancy of the moonlight. Now the three men who followed out of the bar-room were agreed regarding the worthlessness of life. 'All I live for is beer and women.' The phrase caught on William's ear, and he said, 'Quite right, old mate,' and held out his hand to Bill Evans. 'Beer and women, it always comes round to that in the end, but we mustn't let them hear us say it.' Bill promised to see Sarah safely home. Esther tried to interpose, but William could not be made to understand, and Sarah and Bill drove away together in a hansom, Sarah dozing off on his shoulder, and it was difficult to awaken her when the cab stopped before a house whose respectability took Bill by surprise.


CHAPTER XXXIV

'Is that you, Sarah?'

'Yes, it is me.'

'Then come in. How is it that we've not seen you all this time? What's the matter?'

'I've been out all night. Bill put me out of doors this morning, and I've been walking about ever since.'

'Bill put you out of doors? I don't understand.'

'You know Bill Evans, the man we met on the racecourse, the day we went to the Derby. It began there. He took me home after your dinner at the "Criterion," and it has been going on ever since.'

'Good Lord! Tell me about it.'

-288-

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Esther Waters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxiii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxv
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF GEORGE MOORE xxvii
  • EPISTLE DEDICATORY xxix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 8
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter VI 41
  • Chapter VI 47
  • Chapter VI 50
  • Chapter VI 56
  • Chapter VI 67
  • Chapter VI 72
  • Chapter XII 84
  • Chapter XIII 94
  • Chapter XIV 109
  • Chapter XV 115
  • Chapter XVI 120
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVII 138
  • Chapter XVII 152
  • Chapter XVII 161
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XXII 182
  • Chapter XXIII 185
  • Chapter XXIII 192
  • Chapter XXV 198
  • Chapter XXVI 214
  • Chapter XXVI 232
  • Chapter XXVI 237
  • Chapter XXVI 239
  • Chapter XXVI 248
  • Chapter XXVI 265
  • Chapter XXVI 272
  • Chapter XXVI 281
  • Chapter XXVI 288
  • Chapter XXVI 300
  • Chapter XXVI 308
  • Chapter XXVI 311
  • Chapter XXVI 321
  • Chapter XXVI 326
  • Chapter XXVI 336
  • Chapter XXVI 343
  • Chapter XLII 358
  • Chapter XLIII 366
  • Chapter XLIII 376
  • Chapter XLIII 384
  • Chapter XLIII 388
  • Chapter XLVII 392
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 397
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