The Failure of Democratic Politics in Fiji

By Stephanie Lawson | Go to book overview

7
The Test for Democratic Politics in Fiji

THE RISE OF LABOUR

The party system retained its essentially racially oriented form until the emergence of the Fiji Labour Party in 1985. In that year a combination of social and economic problems, a general perception of growing arrogance on the part of the Alliance, which had imposed a wages, prices, and dividends freeze without reference to the Tripartite Forum,1 and the declining ability of the moribund NFP to challenge or criticize unpopular government policies in any effective way, led to a new groundswell of discontent which found practical expression via the multi-racial Fiji Trade Union Congress (FTUC). This body moved quickly to set up a Labour Party as a new opposition force.2

The FTUC is probably the largest organized body in Fiji, and at the time of Labour's foundation, it had 37 affiliated unions and a membership of more than 40,000 workers.3 The most dominant of the affiliated unions was the Fiji Public Service Association (FPSA) whose secretary, Mahendra Chaudhry, was a prime figure behind the emergence of the new party.4 The Labour Party President, Dr Timoci Bavadra, was for seven years the FPSA President.5

Although the new party adopted an explicitly multi-racial (or non-racial) approach to politics, and to its own organizational structures, it was decided from the outset that the party would be led by a Fijian. This was a tactical move prompted by the need to avoid accusations from the Alliance that the party was a 'cover' for Fiji Indian political ambitions, and Fiji Indian members were more than willing to acknowledge a certain

____________________
1
Composed of government, employer representatives, and the trade union group.
2
See R. T. Robertson, "'The Formation of the Fiji Labour Party'", New Zealand Monthly Review, Oct. 1985, 3 ff..
3
Canberra Times, 5 July 1985, 4.
4
Bulletin, 23 July 1985, 21.
5
Islands Business, 11 ( 1985), 24.

-234-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Failure of Democratic Politics in Fiji
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.