Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50-250

By Simon Swain | Go to book overview

10
Pausanias

INTRODUCTION

The next major figure to be studied is the periegete or 'guide', Pausanias, the author of the Periêgêsis Hellados or Guide to Greece. The work is famous in modern times, but it is not known whether it was much read by contemporaries. Certainly, it is not mentioned by surviving ancient authors until the sixth century, when it was used by the Byzantine geographer Stephanus, who found it a serviceable source for his own Ethnica. Stephanus gives us both the title of the work and the name of its writer. The Guide to Greece thus shows familiar symptoms of the death of the author.1 The work, in ten books, was written over a long time. It was certainly commenced before 160 (or shortly after) and seems to have been published not much earlier than 180.2 Extensive cross-referencing between books guarantees that it was planned and written as a whole.3 These dates

____________________
1
The quotation of Pausanias viii. 36. 6 at Aelian, Varied History xii. 61 is almost certainly an interpolation added after this part of Aelian was epitomized: Diller 1955: 272, id. 1956: 88 (it is still accepted as genuine by Pouilloux in Casevitz- Pouilloux-Chamoux 1992: p. x, cf. Musti 1984: 12).
2
Regenbogen 1956: 1093; Heer 1979: 12; Habicht 1985: 9. The date is provided by the reference at v. 1. 2 to Corinth having been refounded by Julius Caesar 217 years before (i.e. written about 174) and at viii. 43. 6 to Marcus Aurelius' defeat of the Germans and the Sarmatians (i.e. after 175). There is no mention of Commodus. The start of work predates the death of Regilla, wife of Herodes Atticus, before 160 ( Ameling 1983: ii. 9), since Pausanias later apologizes for not having mentioned in his first book on Attica the Odeum built by Herodes at Athens in her honour (vii. 20. 6).
3
Cf. e.g. i. 24. 5 citing ix. 26. 2; x. 19. 5 citing i. 3. 5-4. 6. There are no references to any book beyond the tenth; a rogue reference in Stephanus to an eleventh book (pointing to a treatment of Euboea) seems to be an error ( Regenbogen 1956: 1011; for a different view see Diller 1955: 274-5). There are signs of incompleteness in the 'false' reference of ix. 23. 7 (x. 38. 1 does not fulfill the promise), and many have felt signs of haste in the account of Delphi in Book x. For the idea that Book i was published separately see Frazer 1898: i. pp. xvii-xviii; against, Regenbogen 1956: 1010-11, Habicht 1985: 7-8.

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Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50-250
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Greeks 15
  • 1 - Language and Identity 17
  • 2 - The Practice of Purism 43
  • 3 - Past and Present 65
  • 4 - The Greek Novel and Greek Identity 101
  • Part Two - Greeks and Rome 133
  • 5 - Plutarch 135
  • 6 - Dio of Prusa 187
  • 7 - Arrian and Appian 242
  • 8 - Aristides 254
  • 9 - Lucian 298
  • 10 - Pausanias 330
  • II - Galen 357
  • 12 - Philostratus 380
  • 13 - Cassius Dio 401
  • Conclusion 409
  • APPENDIX A The Dating of the Greek Novels 423
  • APPENDIX B Sosius Senecio's Alleged Eastern Origin 426
  • APPENDIX C The Dating of Dio of Prusa's Rhodian and Alexandrian Orations 428
  • APPENDIX D Galen's On Theriac to Piso 430
  • Bibliography 433
  • Index 475
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