Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50-250

By Simon Swain | Go to book overview

II
Galen

The next major figure, the physician, medical writer, and philosopher Galen, is one of the most accomplished intellectuals of the second century, a man of standing in his own time and hugely influential afterwards.1 Galen was born in Pergamum in 129 into the heart of second sophistic society. His father practised geometry and architecture among other learned subjects, and from an early age Galen was immersed through his care in a philosophical, literary, and scientific education of the highest quality.2 Galen's numerous surviving writings--which are by no means restricted to medicine--show a man obsessed with two things: education and the furtherance of knowledge on the one hand, on the other his own attainments and talent. Since Galen lived at Rome for well over thirty years in the latter part of the second century and developed many contacts with the elite of the capital, including successive emperors from Marcus to Severus, he offers a particularly good opportunity for further discovering Greek attitudes to the Roman Empire.


GALEN IN ROME I

Galen was already a well respected doctor by 157 when he returned to Pergamum after a period of several years study in Alexandria,

____________________
1
Galen's works are cited by volume and page of Kühn edition ( 1821-33; repr. 1965), unless otherwise specified; the traditional Latin title will be given at the first occurrence. A concordance with modern editions of individual works can be found in Nutton 1981: 263-4, Hankinson 1991: 238-47, López- Férez 1991: 309-29.
2
On his life see Nutton 1972, and esp. id. 1973. Galen's Roman name is unknown ( 'Claudius' is an early modern fiction); Kudlien 1986: 84-6 suggests he remained a peregrinus, but this seems implausible. Architecture, etc.: v. 42. 5-6, vi. 755. 11-12; that Galen's father Nico ( Suda y 32) was the learned Pergamene architect Aelius Nico (PIR2 G 24; Bowersock 1969: 60) or his colleague Julius Nicodemus 'also called Nico' (cf. Nutton 1979: 183) is a likely assumption.

-357-

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Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50-250
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Greeks 15
  • 1 - Language and Identity 17
  • 2 - The Practice of Purism 43
  • 3 - Past and Present 65
  • 4 - The Greek Novel and Greek Identity 101
  • Part Two - Greeks and Rome 133
  • 5 - Plutarch 135
  • 6 - Dio of Prusa 187
  • 7 - Arrian and Appian 242
  • 8 - Aristides 254
  • 9 - Lucian 298
  • 10 - Pausanias 330
  • II - Galen 357
  • 12 - Philostratus 380
  • 13 - Cassius Dio 401
  • Conclusion 409
  • APPENDIX A The Dating of the Greek Novels 423
  • APPENDIX B Sosius Senecio's Alleged Eastern Origin 426
  • APPENDIX C The Dating of Dio of Prusa's Rhodian and Alexandrian Orations 428
  • APPENDIX D Galen's On Theriac to Piso 430
  • Bibliography 433
  • Index 475
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