The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals

By Colin Campbell; Bert A. Rockman | Go to book overview

2
Management in a Sandbox: Why the Clinton White House Failed to Cope with Gridlock

COLIN CAMPBELL

This chapter focuses on the role of the White House in what we might call the gridlock era of the U.S. presidency. Its analysis concentrates on Bill Clinton's experience by the midpoint of his term. But it lays the groundwork for this analysis by underscoring the antecedents of gridlock in the Reagan/ Bush years.

The disarray of the current administration prompts us to ask what difference might organization of the White House have made? The White House was neither completely amorphous nor porous when Clinton assumed office. Further, the administration has made several efforts--some of which have achieved good results--at improving the structure and operation of the White House. Nevertheless, things have gone badly wrong. Thus we have to entertain two possibilities: either Bill Clinton pathologically lacks the ability to connect with organizational structure or the magnitude of gridlock has reached the point where any incumbent, independent of personal style and the organization of his White House, would encounter frustrations of the degree currently experienced by the president.

What do we mean by gridlock? If years from now historians go back and look at the 1992 presidential election, they are going to be tempted to call it the gridlock election. Continued frustrations with spasmodic governance in Washington have now led to the chastisement of the president--the first time that a Democratic president has had to deal with a Republican- dominated Congress since 1947-49. Ironically, this probably means that

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.