Separate but Equal Branches: Congress and the Presidency

By Charles O. Jones | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A number of colleagues commented on one or more of the chapters included in this volume and I wish to acknowledge their help. Some were editors of books in which the essays were first published, others were discussants on panels when the papers were presented, and a few were generous enough to read my initial drafts just because I asked them to do so. The list includes Eric L. Davis, Anthony King, John W. Kingdon, Thomas E. Mann, Norman J. Ornstein, Samuel C. Patterson, Nelson W. Polsby, Bert A. Rockman, Steven S. Smith, Randall Strahan, Stephen Wayne, Joseph White, and James Sterling Young.

Various sources provided financial support for one or more of the papers: The Brookings Institution, American Enterprise Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Graduate School and the Glenn B. and Cleone Off Hawkins Chair in Political Science), University of Pittsburgh (Maurice Falk Chair in Politics), University of Virginia (The Miller Center and the Robert Kent Gooch Chair in Government), Nuffield College, Oxford University (John M. Olin Chair in American Government), Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library, and John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. I am very grateful for this support.

Chatham House Publishers provided its usual superb editorial and publication assistance in the production of this book. Ed Artinian even chose the title. Like so many, I miss Ed greatly. He was an author's book man. He loved making and selling books and talking about his craft. I will ever cherish our friendship. It is my good luck, and that of other Chatham House authors, that Bob Gormley has taken his place.

Irene Glynn carefully edited the manuscript, offering important suggestions for improving the readability of works written at different times. Roger and Grace Egan prepared the index.

The first edition was dedicated to my wife's parents--two extra- ordinary people who emigrated to the United States during World War II. This edition is dedicated to their great grandchildren. I just know that Anne and Joe Mire would approve of the change.

-v-

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Separate but Equal Branches: Congress and the Presidency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Introduction vii
  • Part I - The Separated System 1
  • 1 - The Constitutional Balance 19
  • 2- Presidential Government and the Separation of Powers 23
  • 3- The Presidency in Contemporary Politics 37
  • Notes 57
  • 4- The Diffusion of Responsibility 59
  • 5- Presidents and Agendas 77
  • Notes 101
  • Part II- Presidents Working with Congresses 103
  • 6- The Pendulum of Power 105
  • 7- Presidential Negotiating Styles with Congress 128
  • 8- Carter and Congress 161
  • 9 - Reagan and Congress 192
  • Notes 217
  • 10- Bush and Congress 220
  • II- Clinton and Congress 247
  • Notes 279
  • Index 285
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