The Portuguese Economy since 1974

By David Corkill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Portugal and Europe

Portugal's initial application for membership of the European Economic Community made in March 1977 by Mario Soares's Socialist government was principally motivated by political considerations. European support was regarded as essential for the consolidation of the fledgling pluralist democracy and as a bulwark against a return to dictatorship. Only later did integration into the EC come to be regarded as a prerequisite for further economic growth and prosperity as well as a guarantee of political stability. The gestation period was protracted: after the first formal approaches were made to Brussels in March 1977, nine years of negotiations over entry terms followed before the accession treaty was signed in June 1985. Portugal finally became a full member of the EC on 1 January 1986.

It is far too simplistic to regard 1974 as the turning point when Portugal abandoned her colonial empire and turned towards Europe. Forces were already at work during the dictatorship that forged closer links between Portugal and her continental neighbours. Indeed, one of the principal reasons for the failure of Caetano's liberalisation strategy was his attempt to 'reconcile the irreconcilable': to integrate more closely with Europe while attempting to maintain the imperial connection and Atlanticist tradition ( Sammis 1988). It is interesting to note that many industrial groups, which might be expected to be among the most enthusiastic proponents of Europeanisation, proved reluctant to abandon their substantial African interests. So the advocacy of European integration was often hedged around with qualifications, and it was only when military intervention overturned the old order and foreclosed the colonial option that Europe emerged the best, and perhaps only, hope for stability and prosperity. Nevertheless, a strong anti-western current, rooted as much in the Salazarist era as in the revolutionary period, continued to generate political divisions throughout the 1970s. The ' Africa versus Europe' debate was kept alive by, among others, President Ramalho Eanes ( 1976-86), who favoured closer links with the former colonies despite the much-reduced economic logic.

The decolonisation process, together with the marked shifts in the patterns of

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Portuguese Economy since 1974
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Chapter 1 the Authoritarian Legacy 1
  • Chapter 2 from Political to Economic Crisis Portugal 1968-85 29
  • Chapter 3 the Structure of the Portuguese Economy 53
  • Chapter 4 Portugal and Europe 88
  • Chapter 5 Economic Boom and Modernisation the Economy Under Cavaco Silva, 1985-91 117
  • Conclusion 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Index 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.