The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming! Pageantry and Patriotism in Cold-War America

By Richard M. Fried | Go to book overview

3
Capturing the Streets for Loyalty

A parade can be an ambiguous sociopolitical construct. It enables those who rule to impress their sense of right order upon an audience in a linear, moving ceremony full of symbol, protocol and ornament. Yet groups with differing interests can offer competitive dramaturgy of their own. When one aspires to seize ceremonial space and time and to dictate proper appearance and behavior, any opposition element may well assert its own claim to such public commodities. Like its brute cousin the riot, a parade is a show of power. During the Cold War, having or lacking power often dictated who might parade and who might not. 1

Not surprisingly, contests over the right to mount public display, and its timing and location, embroiled the Left and its foes during the Cold War. Since the Bolshevik Revolution--and even before--it had galled conservatives to see radicals claim public areas to celebrate and instruct through sociodramas of their own devising. The right-wing American Defense Society deemed it scandalous that, during the 1926 Passaic furriers strike, kids were led by the Communist Young Pioneers of America in playground games like "Strikers and Scabs." 2

In the Cold War era, anti-communists witnessed numerous leftist demonstrations, all of which offended them. When eleven Communist

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming! Pageantry and Patriotism in Cold-War America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction Patriotic Pageantry in America 1
  • 1 - Wake Up, America 11
  • 2 - Precious Freight the Freedom Train 29
  • 3 - Capturing the Streets for Loyalty 51
  • 5 - The Cold War Belongs to Us All"" 87
  • 6 - The Cornwallises Send Regrets Historical Commemoration in the 1950s 99
  • 7 - Patriotic Gore 119
  • 8 - Shame on Them"" 139
  • Conclusion 151
  • Notes 161
  • Manuscript Sources 207
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.