The Invisible Poet: T. S. Eliot

By Hugh Kenner | Go to book overview

ARIEL POEMS

In the years between The Waste Land and A Song for Simeon we discern Eliot shifting his attention from project to project, with evident difficulty and indecision. Doris's Dream Songs, three lyrics apparently constructed out of Waste Land remnants, appeared in November, 1924. The title suggests that they may have been intended for the play about Dusty and Doris on which he was then working. The play in turn was perhaps a delayed by-product of an attempt at translating the Agamemnon, into which Pound had spurred him four years earlier. This translation never appeared, though a draft of it seems to have been mailed to Pound in December, 1921.* One of the "Doris" lyrics was incorporated into The Hollow Men, two became Minor Poems, and the published dramatic fragments are devoid of "dream songs." These dramatic fragments appeared in print in 1926 and 1927, ascribed to a work entitled WannaGo Home, Baby?

____________________
*
See Pound, Guide to Kulchur, p. 92. The following month Pound wrote back, "Aeschylus not so good as I had hoped, but haven't had time to improve him yet." In the same correspondence we find a convalescent Eliot reporting that he is "trying to read Aristophanes." The Letters of Ezra Pound, pp. 170-1.

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The Invisible Poet: T. S. Eliot
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I. POSSUM IN ARCADY 1
  • Prufrock 3
  • Laforgue and Others 13
  • Bradley 40
  • II. IN THE VORTEX 71
  • Satires 73
  • Criticism 94
  • Gerontion 124
  • III. THE DEATH OF EUROPE 143
  • The Waste Land 145
  • Hollow Men 183
  • IV. SWEENEY AMONG THE PUPPETS 195
  • Supplementary Dialogue on Dramatic Poetry 197
  • Sweeney and the Voice 222
  • V. THAT THINGS ARE AS THEY ARE 237
  • Ariel Poems 239
  • Ash-Wednesday 261
  • Murder in the Cathedral 276
  • VI. INTO OUR FIRST WORLD 287
  • Four Quartets 289
  • VII. POSSUM BY GASLIGHT 325
  • Prepared Faces 327
  • Index 343
  • About the Author 347
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