The Academic Man: A Study in the Sociology of a Profession

By Logan Wilson | Go to book overview

IV. STAFF MEMBER

His previous student and apprentice roles have set a permanent stamp upon our typological individual, and without being fully aware of it he already bears unmistakable earmarks of the academic profession even before assuming his initial status as a regular staff member of the university. Although his long and arduous conditioning may have had traumatic effects upon his psyche, the young employee typically mounts the first rung of the occupational ladder with zest and pleasant anticipations.

However unique and important his new status may seem to him, it appears institutionally as a mere part of the process of general metabolism, or gradual change in membership of the university. To provide for continuity of organization, new members are selected to fill vacancies resulting from the loss of old members or from the creation of new positions. Vacancies are filled both from within and without the local organization. For higher ranks, with the exception in many places of departmental headships and other major posts, vacancies are more often than not filled by promotion of men already on the staff. This kind of in-group selection has no reference, though, to where the individual got his training. There is another type of in-group selection known as 'inbreeding,' which refers to the initial placement and later treatment of individuals in the university that graduated them. Since administrative policy in this regard vitally affects the employee status of the academic man, it is important to give the matter a cursory review.

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The Academic Man: A Study in the Sociology of a Profession
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Title Page vii
  • List of Tables viii
  • INTRODUCTION: THE ACADEMIC MAN 2
  • PART I THE ACADEMIC HIERARCHY 13
  • Ii. Professional Recruit 15
  • Iii. Student and Apprentice 33
  • Iv. Staff Member 53
  • V. Professor Administrant 71
  • PART II ACADEMIC STATUS 95
  • Vi. Status Appraisal 97
  • Vii. Professional Status 113
  • Viii. Socio-Economic Status 13
  • PART III ACADEMIC PROCESSES AND FUNCTIONS 155
  • Ix. Prestige and Competition 157
  • X. Prestige and the Teaching Function 175
  • Xi. Prestige and the Research Function 195
  • PART IV CONCLUSIONS 215
  • Xii. Conclusions 217
  • APPENDICES 227
  • Index 243
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