The Neutrality Policy of the United States

By Julia E. Johnsen | Go to book overview

should undoubtedly be borne equitably by all nations. But the creation of what could be regarded as an international "police" force calls for three things, provision for change, harmonizing the policies of all nations with current standards of international conduct, the organization of force on some basis other than the grouping of the armies of sovereign states each with its own special interests.

The second question raised is whether mandatory legislation would require the extension of embargoes to members of the League employing sanctions. Obviously it would not so long as they did not engage in military action. If they did, the embargo would apply. If this country then wished to support them in such action, it could do so thru a declaration of war by Congress, but it would not become a participant in the war by slipping into it thru trade arrangements in which the people and Congress had no part. At this point, it becomes clear that involved in this issue is the question of critical importance to democratic government--is the actual war- making power to be in the hands of the Executive or of Congress?

On these many grounds, adequate mandatory neutrality legislation has widespread and determined support as the most far-reaching contribution which the United States can make toward permanent world peace.


CONTRABAND AND NEUTRAL TRADE3

I suggest that, prior to a future war, at least at its very outset, the United States should endeavor to negotiate agreements with the belligerents, under which the United States should not challenge the right of the belligerent to restrict the flow of our neutral commerce

____________________
3
From article by Charles Warren, formerly Assistant Attorney General of the United States. Academy of Political Science. Proceedings. 16: 189-94. January, 1935.

-156-

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The Neutrality Policy of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Contents 5
  • Summary of the Arguments 9
  • Bibliography 39
  • Definitions 71
  • General Discussion 77
  • Historical Development of the Law Of Neutrality 77
  • Legal Position of Neutrality 82
  • Neutrality and War Prevention 85
  • Position of American Neutrality During the World War 89
  • Covenant of the League of Nations And Neutrality 94
  • Neutrality Policy of August 1935 104
  • American Policy 105
  • New Proposals 109
  • Price of Neutrality 118
  • Brief Excerpts 126
  • Affirmative Discussion 145
  • Neutral Policy for America 145
  • Mandatory Neutrality 152
  • Contraband and Neutral Trade 156
  • Future of Neutrality 162
  • Safeguards to Neutrality 167
  • Dragging America into War 174
  • American Neutrality 178
  • Propaganda Balance Sheet 180
  • Brief Excerpts 182
  • Negative Discussion 205
  • Cost of Peace 205
  • World Chaos Once More 213
  • Neutrality and International Organization 219
  • Is Neutrality Consistent With International Cooperation? 226
  • Neutrality and Neutral Rights Following the Pact Of Paris 231
  • Neutrality and War Prevention 238
  • Our Foreign Policy with Respect To Neutrality 241
  • Economics of Neutrality 243
  • Brief Excerpts 245
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