Readings in Perception

By David C. Beardslee; Michael Wertheimer | Go to book overview

Index*
*Page numbers in italics are for bibliographical entries.
Absolute judgment, method of, 90- 114
Absolute threshold, defined, 48 measurement of, 46-58 (See also Threshold)
Accentuation, preferred in perceptual organization, 182, 187
Accommodation, a cue for distance, 413, 418-419
and perception of homogeneous stimulation, 63
Achromatic stimuli (see Brightness; Color, modes of appearance of, achromatic; Constancy, of brightness; Contrast, of brightness)
Activity, perception of, 382-389
Acuity, visual, of Navaho, 165-166
Adams, G. K., 275
Adaptation, 251
to color, with bicolored lenses, 528-529
with homogeneous stimulation, 61-69
retinal process in, 66-69
to distorted stimulation, 527-532
sensory, 336
Adaptation level, 257-260
defined, 335
emotion and motives in relation to, 339-350
formulae for, 338-339, 347-348
and perception of color, 275-276
and perceptual categorizing, 693- 694
theory of, described, 335-350
Adaptive behavior, perception as contributing to, 101, 691-725
Ades, H. W., 29, 34, 36
Adornetto, J. S., 639
Adorno, T. W., 683
Adrenochrome, effects on perception, 37-42
Adrian, E. D., 362, 366, 397
Aerial perspective as a cue to distance, 418, 429
Aesthetic feelings, and color, 87
and figure and background, 202
Affect, as determiner of figure and background, 204-209
for figure and for background, 201-203
(See also Motivation)
After-effects, of distorted stimuli, 526-529
of figures, 353-367
and adaptation level, explanation of, 344-345
and perception of vertical, 498- 500
and sensory-tonic theory, 498- 500
After-images, effect of perceptual isolation on, 330-332
Aggressive stimuli, 617-629
Aging and perception, 32-33
Agnosia, 26-29
Allport, F. H., 686, 718, 725
Allport, G., 177, 582, 585
Alpha rhythm, and visual perception, 362
Ambiguity, perception of, 678-683
tolerance for, 660
as a personality variable, 664- 685
(See also Incongruity)
Ambivalence, 667
Ames, A., Jr., 263, 264, 433
Amnesia, 29
Anastasi, A., 173

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