The Crescent and the Rising Sun: Indonesian Islam under the Japanese Occupation, 1942-1945

By Harry J. Benda | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
THE RENAISSANCE OF INDONESIAN ISLAM

The termination of the Acheh War and the subsequent pacification of the Outer Islands ended the phase of military operations. Shortly after the turn of the twentieth century, Dutch control had been consolidated over the entire Indonesian archipelago. Yet the relative tranquillity that resulted from pacification and from the successful application of Snouck Hurgronje's Islamic policy was but short-lived. Before long, the Netherlands found themselves confronted with new, and very vexing, social and political problems in Indonesia. The rapid tide of change, though it came to extend to parts of Sumatra, in the first place appeared on Java, the most populous island in the Indies and the center of Dutch power. Long dormant as a consequence of colonial conquest and domination, Indonesian society, prodded by local forces, but in part also responding to powerful stimuli from the outside, was rapidly coming of age. Indonesian Islam, likewise in the throes of a profound transformation, played an important, and in the initial stages even a leading, role in the birth of the new era.

To no small extent these conspicuous developments were the cumulative result of the impact of the West. Especially during the nineteenth century, Indonesia experienced the effects of Western influence on a rapidly increasing scale. In spite of the three major changes to which Dutch colonial and economic policy was subjected from 1830 onward, these policies yet combined in weakening both the communalism of the Indonesian village and the traditional pattern of political authority.

The forced cultivation of export crops under the so-called Culture System ( 1830-1870) marked the beginnings of the disintegrative process. Though it strengthened the authoritarian

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Crescent and the Rising Sun: Indonesian Islam under the Japanese Occupation, 1942-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.