An Economic Survey of Communist China

By Yuan-Li Wu | Go to book overview

students. Finally, 2.3 million workers and 27 million farmers were enrolled in adult education and training courses. These represented a 16 per cent and 207 per cent increase over the corresponding levels in 1951 and 1950 respectively in the case of workers. In the case of farmers the 1952 figure represented a 75 per cent increase over the corresponding 1951 level and a 677 per cent increase over the 1950 level.62


ALLOCATION OF LABOR

Although the quality of training cannot be gauged on the basis of the numerical growth of students and trainees alone, the seriousness with which the program of skilled labor shortage is being attacked needs to be closely scrutinized. Unfortunately, further discussion of this issue would lead us to an entirely different field, and we must be satisfied with the simple observation that the problem cannot be satisfactorily solved in a short time.

In the meantime, allocation of labor, especially skilled workers, has been instituted to prevent raiding and distribution contrary to official plans. Official cognizance of this problem was given, for instance, in the promulgation of labor registration and allocation regulations in Kwangtung in January, 1954.63 The local labor department has been put in charge of clearing recruitments, together with the placement of unemployed workers with precisely the above-mentioned purpose in mind. Similar reports from other areas, though by no means complete, have indicated that this is a general trend.


NOTES
1
Forced labor is excluded from consideration in this chapter.
2
Constitution of the Trade Union in the People's Republic of China, pp. 4-5, 8-9, and 24, Peking, 1953. See also Hsü Chih-chen's report on the revision of the constitution of the trade union, pp. 34 and 38, ibid.
3
Liberation Daily, Shanghai, September 13, 1949.
4
Report on the experience and development of China's labor movement by Li Li-san in Labor Movement in Shanghai after the Liberation, p. 235, Shanghai, 1950.
5
Chinese Worker, No. 5, p. 68, Peking, June, 1950.
6
Economic Weekly, No. 40, p. 802, Shanghai, 1952.
7
NCNA, May 2, 1954.
8
China Weekly, Hongkong, January 4, 1954.
9
See Liberation Daily, Shanghai, September 18, 1949, and Yangtze Daily, Hankow, September 13, 1949.

-453-

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An Economic Survey of Communist China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Notes 10
  • Chapter Two - Background and Heritage 12
  • Notes 60
  • Chapter Three - Economic Stabilization and Fiscal Policy 64
  • Notes 108
  • Chapter Four - Land Redistribution and Its Implications 113
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Five - Agricultural Production and Self-Sufficiency 154
  • Notes 189
  • Chapter Six - Industrialization, Planning and Socialization 192
  • Notes 232
  • Chapter Seven - An Appraisal of General Industrial Recovery and Development 238
  • Notes 275
  • Chapter Eight - Survey of Selected Industries 280
  • Notes 310
  • Chapter Nine - Forced Labor and Mass Labor Projects 316
  • Notes 338
  • Chapter Ten - Transportation and Domestic Trade 341
  • Notes 390
  • Chapter Eleven - Monetary and Banking Control 395
  • Notes 421
  • Chapter Twelve - Labor Organization and Wages 424
  • Notes 453
  • Chapter Thirteen - Foreign Economic Relations 456
  • Notes 496
  • Chapter Fourteen - Conclusion 501
  • Notes 507
  • Appendix 509
  • Index 552
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