The Colonial Trade of Connecticut

By Roland Mather Hooker | Go to book overview

divers colonial diaries, of the acts of the general court, of the instructions sent to the colonial governors by the board of trade, of the action of the vice-admiralty courts, and of a study of the general British colonial policy in relation to trade with the entire British colonial world.


II

THE early settlers in the River Towns of Hartford, Windsor, and Wethersfield soon discovered trade to be essential if the settlements were to prosper, as it was not possible to produce the various goods and commodities necessary for their well-being. Only by creating a surplus in some exportable product could they import the English manufactured goods so necessary to them. Fortunately, beaver skins proved salable in England, and during the early years of the settlements, large stores of these skins were exported. As the Connecticut towns had no means either to build or to buy vessels large enough to make the voyage across the ocean, most of their exports were sent on small vessels to Boston where they were exchanged for the desired manufactured goods and transshipped overseas. Besides the beaver trade with England, a market for pipe staves, provisions, and livestock was found in the West Indies. These staples could be exchanged for sugar, the chief crop, after 1660, of the English possessions there, and for molasses which could be made into rum, available for trade in New Amsterdam or Boston.

The general court of Connecticut soon realized the importance of putting its export trade into the hands of responsible persons, and in 1638 granted to William Whiting and Thomas Stanton, of Hartford, the exclusive right to the beaver trade with the Indians. In 1640 Governor Hopkins obtained a special right to trade at

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Colonial Trade of Connecticut
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 44

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.