Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774

By Carl Raymond Woodward | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Sketch of Charles Read
(from Aaron Leaming's Diary, November 14, 1775)

WHEN I was in Burlington Jacob Read informed me that his father The Honourable Charles Read Esqr. died the 27th of December 1774 at Martinburg on Tar River 20 miles back of Bath town in North Carolina where he had kept a small shop of goods for some time.

He was born in Philadelphia about 1713.1 He was the son of Charles Read a merchant & sometimes mayor of Philada an active & ruling man by his wife Anne Bond.

Charles had his Education under Alexander Annard who taught him the Latin, & he was near 20 when he left that School.

About 17362 his father sent him to London where he was patronized by Sir Charles Wager one of the Lords of the admirality & said to be a relation. Sir Charles made him a midshipman on board the Penzance man of war of 20 guns, and his father made him remitances to support him in that rank. The Penzance saild for the West Indies; But Charles not having been bred to Sea, But used to the Philadelphia Luxuries and tasted the pleasures of London that life did not suit him. Beside there was a war approaching and Charles had not been used to that Boisterous romantic honour that characterizes the Seaman.

About 1737 or 1738 Charles Sold out, and married the daughter of a rich planter on Antiagua. She was very much of a Creole, not hansom, nor gentele but talked after the Creole accent. Charles at that time passed for a rising genteel young fellow the son of a very rich merchant & eminent grandee in Philadelphia. But its probable that Charles's father might have trusted him with the Secret of his affairs for his father died about the time of this Marriage & Its said his estate was 7000 lb. worse than even with the world & Charles had very soon the inteligence. Its suspected he knew it before he married. Charles however kept all that a Secret & soon came over with his bride to take possession of his supposed estate. When he came away his father-in-law ordered the

____________________
1
In this date, Leaming was in error. Read was born about February 1, 1715.
2
Although the precise date of Read's sailing is not known, there is evidence that he went abroad two or three years earlier than Leaming indicates ( Library Company of Philadelphia Minutes, Dec., 1733, 1, 36-37).

-404-

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Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • BOOK I Charles Read of New Jersey 1
  • One: the Man and His Times 3
  • Two: Youth 22
  • Three: New Jerseyman 39
  • Four: Customs Collector 54
  • Five: Land Speculator 64
  • Six: Countryman 70
  • Seven: Ironmaster 86
  • Eight: Secretary 97
  • Nine: Legislator 121
  • Ten: Councillor 145
  • Eleven: Colonel 164
  • Twelve: Indian Commissioner 179
  • Thirteen: Jurist 195
  • Fourteen: Exile 212
  • BOOK II Reads Notes on Agriculture 227
  • Introduction 229
  • One: the Husbandry of the Soil 235
  • Two: the Husbandry of Plants 254
  • Three: the Husbandry of Animals 322
  • Four: the Husbandry of Bees 366
  • Five: Farm Structures and Farm Implements 368
  • Six: the Husbandry of the Household 385
  • Seven: Fisheries 399
  • APPENDIX A Sketch of Charles Read (from Aaron Leaming's Diary, November 14, 1775) 404
  • APPENDIX B Inventory of the Personal Estate of Charles Read IV 407
  • Bibliography 413
  • Glossary 443
  • Index 451
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