Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774

By Carl Raymond Woodward | Go to book overview

Glossary
(First spelling as in Read's manuscript)
ADDER'S TONGUE: A fern of the genus Ophioglossum, so called from the shape of its fruiting spike.
ALLSPICE: The berry of the pimento or allspice tree, of the West Indies, also a mildly pungent spice prepared from it, supposed to combine the flavor of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.
ALLUM (ALUM): Aluminum sulfate, either alone or in combination.
ANISEED (OIL OF): Anise oil, or oil made from the seed of anise, an herb (Pimpinelia anisum) growing naturally in Egypt, and cultivated in many lands for its aromatic seeds.
ARPENT: An old French measure of land varying from .84 to 1.26 acres, here given as 1 3/16 acre.
ASSAFETIDA (ASAFETIDA): The fetid gum resin of various Persian and East Indian plants, used in medicine, having a strong odor and taste of garlic.
AXLETREE: The spindle or axle of a wheel.
BANDY WICKETT: A curved wicket.
BARM: Yeast formed on brewing liquors.
BATT (BAT): A crooked piece of wood (attached to the horns of oxen; see "bandy wickett").
BAUM (BALM) BEER: Beer flavored with balm, an aromatic herb.
BAY SALT: A coarse-grained variety of common salt, originally obtained from sea water.
BILGE: The protuberant part near the middle, as of a cask.
"BLACK" CATTLE: Bovine cattle in general, of any color.
BLAIN: An inflammatory swelling or sore; a blister.
BOILERS: Peas especially suitable for boiling.
BOLE: A fine, compact, soft clay, usually colored yellow, brown or black by iron oxide, formerly used as a pigment, and in medicine.
BOLSTER: A transverse bar above the axle of a wagon on which the bed or body rests.
BONNY CLABBER: Coagulated sour milk; clabber.
BREAK: An implement for the crushing or breaking of flax and hemp plants in the process of recovering the fiber.
BRISKET: In domestic animals, the breast or lower part of the chest in front of and between the forelegs.
BUDDING: The inserting of a bud into an opening in the bark of a different stock for propagating desired varieties of plants.
BURNFIRE: A bonfire.

-443-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ploughs and Politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey and His Notes on Agriculture, 1715-1774
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • BOOK I Charles Read of New Jersey 1
  • One: the Man and His Times 3
  • Two: Youth 22
  • Three: New Jerseyman 39
  • Four: Customs Collector 54
  • Five: Land Speculator 64
  • Six: Countryman 70
  • Seven: Ironmaster 86
  • Eight: Secretary 97
  • Nine: Legislator 121
  • Ten: Councillor 145
  • Eleven: Colonel 164
  • Twelve: Indian Commissioner 179
  • Thirteen: Jurist 195
  • Fourteen: Exile 212
  • BOOK II Reads Notes on Agriculture 227
  • Introduction 229
  • One: the Husbandry of the Soil 235
  • Two: the Husbandry of Plants 254
  • Three: the Husbandry of Animals 322
  • Four: the Husbandry of Bees 366
  • Five: Farm Structures and Farm Implements 368
  • Six: the Husbandry of the Household 385
  • Seven: Fisheries 399
  • APPENDIX A Sketch of Charles Read (from Aaron Leaming's Diary, November 14, 1775) 404
  • APPENDIX B Inventory of the Personal Estate of Charles Read IV 407
  • Bibliography 413
  • Glossary 443
  • Index 451
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.