Administration of Public Welfare

By R. Clyde White | Go to book overview

LIST OF TABLES
TABLE PAGE
1. Almshouse Inmates in Indiana, by Type of Condition per 100 Total Inmates, 1922 and 193354
2. Penal and Correctional Institutions Operated (or Used) by the Bureau of Prisons in 193876
3. State Public Welfare Agencies in Alabama88
4. State Public Welfare Agencies in New Jersey89
5. Obligations Incurred for Payments to Recipients of General Relief and Special Types of Assistance, in 1936, 1937, and 1938186
6. Number of Recipients of General Relief and Categorical Assistance in March, 1939187
7. Comparison of Average Monthly Payments per Recipient of Old-Age Assistance, Blind Assistance, and Aid to Dependent Children, by States Ranked for Old-Age Assistance from Low to High, August, 1939189
8. Days of Disability (per Person per Year) from Diseases, Accidents, and Impairments, for Persons of Various Ages, according to Economic Status193
9. Ratio of Annual per Capita Volume of Disability for Low-Income Groups to That in the Highest-Income Group, according to Specified Diagnostic Classifications194
10. Physicians' Care, Nursing Care, and Hospital Care Received for Disabling Illness, according to Economic Status195
11. Institutions for the Insane and Epileptics and the Number of Patients on the Books of Each Type at the Beginning of the Year 1936208
12. Movement of Population in State Institutions for the Insane and Epileptics, 1936210
13. Patients of Institutions for the Insane per 100,000 General Population, Excess of Patients over Hospital Capacity, and Percentage of Patients on Parole, 1926-1937, Beginning of Each Year211
14. Administrative Staff of 172 State Hospitals for the Insane, by Occupation and Sex, 1936221
15. Patients per Physician on the Books of State Hospitals and in State Hospitals at the Beginning of the Year 1936, by States223
16. Percentage Distribution of First Admissions to State Hospitals, by Psychosis and Sex, 1936224

-xi-

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