Administration of Public Welfare

By R. Clyde White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
PAST FORMS OF PUBLIC WELFARE ORGANIZATION

Public welfare organization refers to the structure which is created by legislation or set up within the limits of authority granted by legislation for the purpose of carrying on public welfare activities. It is the design which is outlined in the law and completed by the executive. Changes in organization are brought about by changes in policy and by the necessities of administration. Major changes in policy are incorporated in the law, but less important variations may be effected through the rule-making power granted to the administrative authority. Organization and administration should not be confused. Organization may be synonymous with structure which is for a time, at least, static, or it may refer to that active phase of preparation for administering a law when we speak of "organizing" a department or division, that is, setting up a governmental structure for public welfare. Administration is activity. It includes all the activities, from copying dictation to rule-making, which are necessary to carry out the purposes of the law. There can be no administration without organization. Hence, in order to describe public welfare administration today it is necessary to know what kind of structures have been built for this work, and it is useful to know something about the kinds of public welfare organization which have existed in the United States in the past. This chapter is intended to give historical perspective to the student.1

It may appear that the old pauper laws which we borrowed from England differ so much from modern conceptions of public welfare that they do not belong in the same category. The basic principle of those laws was to provide a system of relief under which no deserving person would starve but each person receiving relief would find his

____________________
1
Obviously this chapter cannot be regarded as "the history of public welfare organization." That should be the subject for a separate course in the school of social work.

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Administration of Public Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.