Administration of Public Welfare

By R. Clyde White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
MATERIAL RELIEF

Material relief includes payments of money and assistance in kind. Money payments may be made in cash or by check. Relief in kind may take the form of grocery orders, orders for other necessities, or maintenance in an institution. A relief agency may provide more than one kind of relief; for example, it may pay cash to persons living in their own homes, and it may provide relief in kind to others who are maintained in an almshouse. The agency may give the client cash for food and clothes but pay the rent directly to the landlord. Likewise a client who receives cash to pay his ordinary expenses may be given authority to consult a physician but no money to pay for medical services; the agency pays the physician at some rate previously agreed upon. Some material relief is given under the pauper laws, and the recipient is legally a pauper. On the other hand, certain groups of needy persons have been removed by statute from the jurisdiction of the pauper laws, and the recipient of material relief under these new laws avoids pauper status, although he is being supported at public expense.

The term "pauper" has varying significance. As a colloquial term it is likely to be applied quite generally to the inmates of alms- houses, and it is common to apply it to persons receiving aid from the traditional overseers of the poor, such as township trustees or township supervisors. But many states have adopted new legislation regarding direct relief which does not designate recipients of relief as paupers. Fifteen states, two territories, and the District of Columbia have such laws.1 One of the aims of the new public assistance laws was to remove these special categories of needy persons from the scope of the pauper laws. Historically, "When any member of the legally constituted family is in need of support, and the legal head of the family, on whom the duty to support the family

____________________
1
Robert C. Lowe, State Public Welfare Legislation, 1939, Table 4, pp. 68-69.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Administration of Public Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.