Administration of Public Welfare

By R. Clyde White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
WORK PROGRAM FOR THE UNEMPLOYED

The first work program for the able-bodied unemployed seems to have been created by the English Poor Law of 1601. This act provided "for setting to work the children of all such whose parents shall not by the said Churchwardens and Overseers, or the greater Part of them, be thought able to keep and maintain their children; and also for setting to work all such persons, married or unmarried (as) having no Means to maintain them, use no ordinary or daily Trade of Life to get their Living by."1 All persons unable to work were to be given direct relief. The aim of this old statute was partly to reduce the cost of direct relief and partly to test the willingness of the unemployed child or adult to work for his living. Later when "workhouses" were established, the work test became a "workhouse test." The reasons for the work test and the workhouse test under the English Poor Law were not identical with those which led to the establishment of the great work programs in this country during the depression of the 1930's. Nevertheless, as in this country in the present century, it was believed that work was superior to direct relief in its moral effect on the unemployed workman. It is an interesting commentary on the history of the English Poor Law that during the depression of the 1930's a work program for the unemployed was not revived, but on the contrary the largest and best- organized system of unemployment assistance Great Britain ever had was created alongside of the unemployment insurance scheme.

While the recent work programs in the United States were designed to mitigate the effects of unemployment in the lives of the unemployed, an attempt has been made to differentiate them sharply from other forms of financial assistance and from conventional public works plans. The basis of eligibility for work-program employment was changed several times. It was at various times (1) the

____________________
1
Quoted by Breckinridge, Public Welfare Administration, Select Documents, p. 18.

-296-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Administration of Public Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.