Administration of Public Welfare

By R. Clyde White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIV
BOARDS, COMMITTEES, AND VOLUNTEERS

The public relations of welfare agencies bear a remarkable resemblance to those of the public schools. The nature of the welfare and the educational functions of the community makes this a fact. The public schools bring into their halls the vast majority of all children in every community in the country. Local taxes are levied for school purposes, and the county commissioners usually make it clear how much of the total levy is for school purposes, because few people object to paying taxes to maintain the schools. In almost all communities, except those in which the schools are controlled by the township trustee or supervisor, there is a local school board; there is usually a county board of education and a state board of education. State governments now commonly appropriate funds for grants-in-aid to the public schools. A large proportion of schools have parent-teacher associations which are in effect joint advisory committees composed of parents of children attending the school and the teachers of the school.

How does public welfare organization compare with the public school organization? On the side of service received, a smaller proportion of the people in a community receive direct services from a public welfare agency than receive educational services from the school. But direct service by the schools is rarely for any except children, whereas the welfare agency is available for service to any age group which needs the assistance it can give. Financial support for public welfare comes from local taxes and state grants- in-aid, and the county commissioners and the state legislature want the public to understand how much of the total tax levies is for welfare purposes. The legislators can defend a vote for welfare levies, and the public will favor the levies, so long as reasonable efficiency and honesty are apparent in the agency. Welfare boards are almost, if not quite, as common as school boards; some of them

-447-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Administration of Public Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 532

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.